Wiring stove to new breaker box.

Reply

  #1  
Old 10-31-07, 01:40 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Wiring stove to new breaker box.

I added a new breaker box because the old one was incredibly dated and at capacity, and there was no main breaker. I was tripping breakers if I tried to run my microwave at the same time I was doing dishes with my portable dishwasher. I also started remodeling the living room and it was a perfect oppurtunity to update the wiring in the walls while the drywall was off.

Anyway, I added a new breaker box which is about 2' from the old one. I pulled out all the old breakers from the old box and I am currently utlizing it as a temporary junction box. All the old wiring that used to go to the old breakers are wire nutted to new wires which go to my new breaker box.

The problem is the stove is 220 and the wiring for it is huge, I would say about 4 gauge. The holes in my 50a 220v breaker is too small to take that gauge, but I need to lengthen that by about 2' anyway to reach the new breaker box.

So, I need to extend the wiring for the stove from my old breaker box to my new breaker box about 2'. What is the best way of doing this? I used wire nuts for the rest of the house, it was relatively small 12 or 14 gauge. I would need to go buy HUGE wire nuts to splice the 3 wires which are 4 or 6 gauge. I think I need 6 or 8 gauge wire for it to be to code. Does anyone know for sure?

I don't have access to replace the entire run to the stove though, so splicing is my only option. I want it to be to code though.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 10-31-07, 03:52 AM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
Is the #4 wire aluminum or copper?
 
  #3  
Old 10-31-07, 03:58 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by chandler View Post
Is the #4 wire aluminum or copper?
I think the neutral is aluminum and the two hots are copper, but I could be wrong, I am going off memory as I am at work right now. They may all be aluminum.
 
  #4  
Old 10-31-07, 05:26 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 6,450
Received 54 Votes on 51 Posts
If there is no ground(four wire cable) you are not permitted to extend it. It must be brought up to current code of a four wire feeder.
 
  #5  
Old 10-31-07, 07:07 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well, I need a stove, so how would I extend it?
 
  #6  
Old 10-31-07, 07:08 AM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,973
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Replace the entire cable.
 
  #7  
Old 10-31-07, 10:37 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks, I just twisted it together and used black tape to cover it.
 
  #8  
Old 10-31-07, 11:02 PM
core's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jan 2007
Location: Des Moines, IA
Posts: 1,127
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jdraughn View Post
I want it to be to code though
Thanks, I just twisted it together and used black tape to cover it.
LOL this one made my evening!
 
  #9  
Old 11-01-07, 12:21 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Upvotes: 0
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Originally Posted by jdraughn View Post
Thanks, I just twisted it together and used black tape to cover it.
At least you should use split-bolt connectors, rubber tape, then plastic electric tape (or friction tape).
 
  #10  
Old 11-01-07, 12:34 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Posts: 23
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
At least you should use split-bolt connectors, rubber tape, then plastic electric tape (or friction tape).

Thats actually what I did. I was trying to make a point when I said I twisted them together and used black tape. This is the second time I can remember me asking a question on these forums and the moderators refused to give me an answer because what i was doing would not be too code, or some other reason.

I imagine the moderators job is to make sure that people do everything to code, and do it safely so the website is not liable incase someone burns their house down or is hurt, but by refusing to give an answer like that just increases the chance that someone IS going to do something stupid.

I am doing this to bring my house up to code, but it's not going to happen overnight because I simply DO NOT have the money.
 
  #11  
Old 11-01-07, 06:39 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Group Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Upvotes: 0
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Originally Posted by jdraughn View Post
Thats actually what I did. I was trying to make a point when I said I twisted them together and used black tape. This is the second time I can remember me asking a question on these forums and the moderators refused to give me an answer because what i was doing would not be too code, or some other reason.

I imagine the moderators job is to make sure that people do everything to code, and do it safely so the website is not liable incase someone burns their house down or is hurt, but by refusing to give an answer like that just increases the chance that someone IS going to do something stupid.

I am doing this to bring my house up to code, but it's not going to happen overnight because I simply DO NOT have the money.
It is a difficult line to walk sometimes made even more difficult because of the forum owners stringent rules regarding any debate on issues.
 
  #12  
Old 11-01-07, 02:50 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2007
Posts: 62
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jdraughn View Post
Thanks, I just twisted it together and used black tape to cover it.
LOL, that's great! You should probably edit the post, though, so anyone who happens on it from a search in a similar situation doesn't think you're serious
 
  #13  
Old 11-01-07, 04:32 PM
chandler's Avatar
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 39,967
Upvotes: 0
Received 2 Votes on 2 Posts
I was just going to ask how in the heck a human "twisted" #4 copper or aluminum. If you must have the stove tonight, then you are dedicated to doing it without the help of the forum. No one here can give you information that will place you in harm's way. The codes are in place for a reason. Split connectors, friction tape, electrical tape and a prayer will get you hot tea. But fix it right as soon as you can do it.
 
  #14  
Old 11-02-07, 12:47 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
if you are talking about the old " SE " cables with two large conductors with small netual conducter wrapped around the large conductors if so,, YOU can not extend it at all.

the code is very strict on this.

how far the stove connection to the new breaker box ??

#8-3 NM [ 40 amp ] or #6-3 NM [ 50 amp ]
will do the job fine and IMO it not any harder than try to run with #12 NM's only they are larger but can be run very simiar as the 12NM's can be.

something like this >> http://images.builderssquare.com/Ori...49371_Orig.jpg

if so let us know

Merci, Marc
 
  #15  
Old 07-31-08, 01:24 PM
Member
Join Date: May 2008
Posts: 1
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
chipcarver

could you run the existing wire to a suitable branch box (one that could handle 50amp) then run a new wire the rest of the way?
would this meet code?
thank you
 
  #16  
Old 07-31-08, 06:11 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,471
Received 16 Votes on 14 Posts
No, the cable MUST consist of THREE insulated conductors (one of which must be white or grey) AND an equipment grounding conductor that may be bare or with green insulation.
 
  #17  
Old 07-31-08, 07:06 PM
wgc
wgc is offline
Member
Join Date: Dec 2005
Location: New England
Posts: 362
Upvotes: 0
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
subpanel instead of junction box

You could always use your old panel as a subpanel instead of a junction box: then you are not extending the old oven circuit or modified it in any way. However it sounds like you're way past the point you could easily do that.
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes