First time electrical work


  #1  
Old 11-05-07, 12:14 PM
mackmack's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: usa ohio
Posts: 47
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
First time electrical work

I want to add a few new receptacles in a room. Everything I have read says you start the new wire at the end run. My end run is way on the other side of the room(off a recetacle in the closet).

Can I splice between the 14 gauge copper wire going between to standard receptacles, and add the receptacles(i need them higher on the wall for a flat panel tv install and some standard AV gear) higher on the wall, then string the line right back down the stud and splice it back into the wire that was already there, and I just cut to continue along the original run?

I would have to double back the entire length of the room just to come off the original end run receptacle and drill through about 30 studs. Makes no sense to me.

As long as I am careful and use good quality conenctor caps and further reinforce with electrical tape, I don't understand why I couldn't do that.

Can someone with some experience help me out? Thanks for any advice.
 
  #2  
Old 11-05-07, 12:23 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,911
Received 326 Votes on 281 Posts
You can tap off of any receptacle or maybe a light switch depending on how the switch is wired. You might be required to change the junction box to accomodate box fill requirements. Only a certain number of wires are permitted in a box of a certain size.

You must make all connections inside a junction box. You can not tap off a wire in the middle of a run without adding a junction box and having at least 6 inches of wire from each cable in the box.
 
  #3  
Old 11-05-07, 12:27 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,970
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
First and foremost, do NOTHING until you read a book or two on home wiring. Start with Wiring Simplified. A book will help you figure out what you can and can't do.

You do not have to start a run at the end of a run. That is easiest, but not absolutely necessary. You can tap an existing box for power, provided the box can safely be tapped and that you do so properly.

What you propose, tapping a wire that runs through the wall is usually not possible. First, there would have to be enough slack in the line to allow it. That means about 12 inches of excess cable. Second, you would have to install a permanently accessible junction box in which to make the splice. You are NOT allowed to make a splice in the walls.

But you have to answer the question as to whether this circuit is suitable to be tapped. The answer in your case is most likely no. To tap this circuit it would have to be a properly grounded circuit. Do you know if it is? To tap this circuit it needs to have the capacity to support the added load. Do you know what is on the circuit already?

Trumping all that, however is this: To install a plasma television or any home entertainment equipment you are better off with a new run from the panel.

My suggestion is that you leave your existing wiring alone and install a brand new dedicated circuit from the main panel for this plasma television.
 
  #4  
Old 11-05-07, 03:32 PM
mackmack's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: usa ohio
Posts: 47
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
So if I understand correctly, I can splice the line as long as I add a junction box between the two points and do it all within the box?

For example, I have a receptacle 12 inches off the ground, which continues to another 12 inches off the ground about 6 feet away along the wall(typical). I want to put a junction box in between the two, splice into the original line and continue a new line upwards(3 feet) along the stud... from there I want to add two new receptacles. At that point I will run a new line back to that junction box and splice back into the original wire that will continue to the other receptacles in the room.

As for the load, i have no doubt the circuit can handle it. It is a 20 inch LCD.. it's nothing. The room could handle 10 of them, and I dont have a speaker system or heavy subwoofer.

Also, I have read several books and been all over the web. searching for anything about adding a receptacle to existing wiring either talks about simple tasks like adding a box or wiring a switch or receptacle, or it will say to continue from end run.
 
  #5  
Old 11-05-07, 04:12 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,911
Received 326 Votes on 281 Posts
You can do that. Onlyproblem is they do not leave slack in wires when isntalled. You will not be able get the 6 inches from each end of the cut cable to be able to install the junction box in the middle of the run.
 
  #6  
Old 11-05-07, 04:54 PM
mackmack's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: usa ohio
Posts: 47
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
How about 2 junction boxes then?

One for each splice? would give me the slack I need.

I'd rather do two junction boxes then drill through 20 studs and repair god knows how much drywall.
 
  #7  
Old 11-05-07, 05:41 PM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,970
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You don;t have to drill any studs or repair any drywall.

Run your new circuit down into the basement and then to the panel.
 
  #8  
Old 11-05-07, 05:43 PM
M
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 6
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hi Mack,

First thing, are you indeed the home owner? Is your name on the deed? If you are then continue. If you aren't, you are breaking the law in Ontario by undertaking this task. I feel it's safe to say you aren't a licensed contractor. You do need to come from the end box if you use this circuit, unless the closest box is a deep box and only has 2 14/2 cables entering it. Code stipulates the number of wires entering and leaving the box and box fill. If you do split the circuit remember that all joints must be made inside a box approved for the purpose with solderless connectors and cannot be rendered inaccessible. (means you cant bury joints behind drywall with good marrettes and tape.) Within 48 hrs of commencing work you will need to have a permit. (ESA) Remember to not work on electricity live. Wiring is not a hobby and should not be taken lightly. As mentioned earlier in this thread it is best to run a dedicated circuit for this application. you will need cable as well, either from cable or satellite. Anyway, Gratz on the new TV.
 
  #9  
Old 11-05-07, 05:49 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,911
Received 326 Votes on 281 Posts
Originally Posted by mackmack View Post
How about 2 junction boxes then?

One for each splice? would give me the slack I need.

I'd rather do two junction boxes then drill through 20 studs and repair god knows how much drywall.
That could work. One for each end of the cut cable and a new short peice of cable to join them.
 
  #10  
Old 11-05-07, 09:28 PM
mackmack's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: usa ohio
Posts: 47
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
racraft- the room is in the basement. and on the far side of where breaker box is. its a huge basement with many rooms... atleat 2700 square feet.

michael- i own the home. plus i dont live in Ontario.

So can I get a second vote of confidence other then JoeD? In regards to having the two different junction boxes and splitting off the original circuit? Thanks.
 
  #11  
Old 11-05-07, 09:46 PM
Unclediezel's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Northeastern PA.
Posts: 2,230
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Completely "DO-ABLE" if you dont mind two big ugly blank covers on the wall......All junction boxes MUST remain permanently accessible. They cant be buried in the wall, and they must be accessible "WIthout removing FINISHING Materials."

If you keep this in mind, or you have a nice big Painting to cover the "COVERS" .......(Or otherwise use some ingenuity to make them Visually acceptable" while staying inside the "no hide" Rule......You have your second vote of Confidence.
 
  #12  
Old 11-05-07, 09:55 PM
mackmack's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: May 2007
Location: usa ohio
Posts: 47
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Just curious, but I was under the impression that the junction boxes were necessary because the splice needed a safe and secure area... so that its not just hanging back there or against something flammable or something that is going to short it out.

If that's the case, and the splice takes place within its own junction box, why must it be readily accessible? or why couldn't I drywall over it?

Just curious is all, not really arguing with anybody or suggesting I will be doing it. I don't really see why a plastic plate or 5 inches of drywall makes a difference in terms of safety or reliability.
 
  #13  
Old 11-05-07, 10:09 PM
Unclediezel's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Northeastern PA.
Posts: 2,230
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As far as safety and reliability---"TECHNICALLY " it doesnt.

For the "POWERS THAT BE" ( which take precedence over Technical and logical)... A splice is a weak link....Therefore it must be "SERVICEABLE"....
#2-- The box must be "Flush" with the finishing surface, for FIRE retardant reasons---so in the event of a fire in the box, it is contained inside the box with an "ESCAPE" route to open air, instead of "Burping into a wall". Rather cinge the paint on the sheetrock , than Ignite a stud where you cant see it.
 
  #14  
Old 11-21-07, 10:49 PM
fungku's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: Canada
Posts: 43
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You don't need the two boxes if you just come from one of the receptacles already there.

Turn the breaker off for the receptacless. Then, for the receptacles nearest where you want the new one:
Take off the covers and unscrew the receptacles so you can look behind it and see how many cables go into the box. Then come back on here and tell us how many there are, and where you live. Someone who is familiar with the code in your area should be able to tell you if you can fit another.

If you have oen or two, you should be fine to add another, but this depends where you live, I guess.

Also, remember there is a limit to the number of receptacles you can have on one circuit. In Canada, that is 12.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: