GFCI location question

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Old 11-07-07, 04:01 PM
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GFCI location question

Hi, I have a new house (1999 built) and the inspection caught two places that aren't GFCI protected that probably should be.

The first, is a duplex receptacle at the counter lever of a wet bar. This seems like a no-brainer--it must have a GFCI, right? The explanation for why it doesn't is that it's in a finished basement that probably wasn't permitted.

The other is a duplex receptacle next to the utility sink in my first-floor laundry. The only thing plugged into it is the washing machine. Now, must this receptacle be GFCI protected? The only explanation I could think of is that the washer might trip it all of the time. I don't need to plug anything but the washer in, so maybe I could swap the duplex for a single outlet? Thanks for the advice!
 
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Old 11-07-07, 04:10 PM
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One of the pro's will chime in momentarily, But......

I dont believe it must physically be a GFCI outlet, as opposed to GFCI protection... is there a GFCI upstream that may feed this outlet.?

The washer may be exempt if it conceals the outlet, and it is a dedicated CKT....--A stationary load on a dedicated ckt.

The simplex receptacle, would accomplish this, but only if the ckt is dedicated to that one location.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 04:24 PM
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GFCIs were not required at these locations at the time the house was built.

What inspection caught these, and why are you concerned about them?
 
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Old 11-07-07, 04:54 PM
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Unclediezel: The duplex receptacle that the washer is plugged into isn't concealed by the washer. It's about a foot above it, and a foot to the right of the utility sink. Neither location is protected by an upstream GFCI, at least according to my cheap GFCI tester and my inspector's tester that placed a "load" on the receptacles.

racraft: my home inspector caught these about a month ago. While they may not have been required before, are they not a good idea to install now? Nothing in particular worries me about these, I just thought it might be a good idea.

Thanks for the input!
 
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Old 11-07-07, 06:00 PM
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What do you mean, "my home inspector caught these about a month ago?" Were you in the process of buying the house? If so, and it concerned you, you should have asked the seller to install them.

Code now requires any receptacles within six feet of a sink to be GFCI protected. This code is not retroactive, so you don't have to do anything unless you want to.

Is it a good idea? Only you can answer that. Are you likely to plug something in to either of those receptacles? If so, then you should GFCI protect them. However, if you don't intend to use them (other than for the washer that is always plugged in) then it won't make a difference.

If it were my house I would install a GFCI receptacle next to the wet bar sink. Then I might install a simplex receptacle for the washer, or a GFCI receptacle and then not worry about it.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 07:14 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
What do you mean, "my home inspector caught these about a month ago?" Were you in the process of buying the house? If so, and it concerned you, you should have asked the seller to install them.

Code now requires any receptacles within six feet of a sink to be GFCI protected. This code is not retroactive, so you don't have to do anything unless you want to.

Is it a good idea? Only you can answer that. Are you likely to plug something in to either of those receptacles? If so, then you should GFCI protect them. However, if you don't intend to use them (other than for the washer that is always plugged in) then it won't make a difference.

If it were my house I would install a GFCI receptacle next to the wet bar sink. Then I might install a simplex receptacle for the washer, or a GFCI receptacle and then not worry about it.
Yep, the inspector flagged these when I was buying the house. I didn't want to ask the buyer to do nitpicky things like this since they were already doing some major construction for us.

Thanks for the advice. I'm going to install the GFCI. Might as well keep up with the codes on something that's so easy to do.
 
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Old 11-07-07, 07:26 PM
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Another reason to install GFCI protection is that when you eventually sell, the home inspector for the buyer may point out the same issues. The buyer may ask you to do something. If you have already done it then you are that much ahead, plus you have gained the benefit of the GFCI all those years...
 
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