I want to wire my shop


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Old 11-10-07, 02:35 PM
T
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I want to wire my shop

I want to run electricity to my shed. How do I wire a 220/60 amp circuit breaker into my main panel and then split it into two 110 circuits in the shed?
 
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Old 11-10-07, 02:43 PM
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Your asking this questions convinces me you're not up to the job. There are many good wiring books available. Please read a few of them before proceeding.
 
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Old 11-10-07, 03:04 PM
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You don't. You install a sub panel in your shed, and run any necessary circuits from the sub panel.

But you do nothing until you learn how. Buy and read three books on home wiring, starting with Wiring Simplified. After you read the books you can then plan your installation, then post it back here and we will comment on it.
 
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Old 11-10-07, 03:22 PM
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Re

I was looking for some help, not criticism. I know I need to wire a subpanel in my shed. What I don't know is: Can I wire a 220 circuit breaker into my main, run 10/2 wire from it to the shed, then wire breakers from the subpanel. I already have the 10/2, breakers, and subpanel; I just don't know if I can use the 10/2, or if I should get 10/3, 8/3 or 6/3 wire. I have a 60amp 220 breaker for the main box and 30 amp 110 breakers for the shed.
 
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Old 11-10-07, 03:53 PM
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No, you cannot use 10-2. 10-2 would only give you 120 volts, not 240, and it would also only be good for 30 amps not 60.

You need THREE current carrying conductors, plus possibly a ground wire. You need 6 gage wire for 60 amps. You also need a ground rod (or two) at the shed.

What do you plan on doing with the 30 amp breakers for the shed? Unless you have tools that need 30 amps, they are useless. What you need are 15 and/or 20 amp breakers, for lights and for traditional 120 volt receptacles.
 
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Old 11-10-07, 04:06 PM
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You got criticism because an electrical screw up can cause a fire and kill people. Settle down and be safe.
 
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Old 11-10-07, 05:16 PM
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I will need more information to be able to help you.
What size main breaker do you have 60 amp,100 amp. or 200 amp?
Where is your service panel in relationship to your shed. will you have to run wire underground? What is the distance?

Richard
 
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Old 11-10-07, 10:23 PM
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TNT, I saw some honest talk, but no criticism in this thread. Believe me when I say that I've seen plenty of criticism, but overt and subtle, in this forum but I don't see any here.

There are hundreds of details you need to know to do this project correctly. It would take a book to describe them all. It's not out of line to suggest you read a book.

We can get you started, and we can outline the project for you, and we can answer questions along the way, but giving complete start-to-finish step-by-step instructions is infeasible.

However, we don't want to scare you off. Many hundreds of do-it-yourselfers just like you do this job every year. It's entirely within your capabilities. But we don't want you to underestimate the project either. Get just one detail wrong and you could create a hazard, and/or end up with something that doesn't satisfy your needs. We don't want either of those to happen.

To answer the specific questions you've asked so far:

Can I wire a 220 circuit breaker into my main
Yes.

run 10/2 wire from it to the shed
No.

then wire breakers from the subpanel
Yes.

I already have the 10/2
You have the wrong cable--wrong for quite a few reasons.

I just don't know if I can use the 10/2, or if I should get 10/3, 8/3 or 6/3 wire.
You need 6/3, but not just any 6/3. It has to be the right kind of 6/3. There are many kinds that would be right and many kinds that would be wrong.

I have a 60amp 220 breaker for the main box
That's probably fine.

and 30 amp 110 breakers for the shed
That's almost certainly wrong.

What else will the book tell you? What kind of cable to buy, how deep to bury it, how to figure in voltage drop, how to install a grounding rod, how to protect and secure the cable, how to isolate the ground and neutral in the subpanel, how to run circuits in the shed, correct breaker sizes for different kinds of circuits, legal places to mount the subpanel, disconnect requirements, where and how to staple the cable, how to make safe and legal splices, differences between equipment grounding and system grounding, how to compute if the new loads will overload your service, etc. etc. etc.
 
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Old 11-11-07, 08:58 PM
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Re

OK, I got everything figured out, this is not my first time working with wiring, but it is my first time with this big of a project; all my other ones came out fine. Why would I need a grounding rod at the shed, I'm coming out of the main panel for my house, which is already grounded, and then how and what do I connect it to.
 
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Old 11-12-07, 04:16 AM
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The short answer as to why you need a grounding rod at the shed is because it's required by the code.

The long answer is because you want to provide a proper reference to ground for the panel and because you want to provide a path for excess current from an outside event.
 
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Old 11-12-07, 08:24 AM
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This all has to do with the two distinct types of grounding systems.

The grounding rod at the shed connects to the grounding bar in the subpanel. The grounding wire from the house also connects here. The grounding bar and the neutral bar in the subpanel must be electrically isolated from each other. Every panel provides a way to do this, but you usually have to do something to make it happen.
 
 

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