Wiring Electric Heat BiMetal Line Voltage Thermostat


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Old 11-10-07, 04:57 PM
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Wiring Electric Heat BiMetal Line Voltage Thermostat

i just purchased a Marley electric baseboard heater and thermostat and am very confused with the diagrams included with both. Here is what I have going on... My whole house is gas forced air, b ut there is a bedroom in the attic with no heat, so I am trying to install it as an auxilary occasional heat source. I already ran romex 12-2 wire from a new 20 amp breaker to the attic and it is ready to be installed to the thermostat. here is where I am lost. the thermostat has 4 wires on the back of it and a grounding screw. the wires are 2 black and 2 red. on the left side of the baseboard unit there is a black wire and on he right side there is a black and red wire twisted together. What do I need to do to get heat going here?

Can you be specific as to what the difference is between line and load wires? Where does each go? What do I do with the red and black tied together on the baseboard? I assume I take them apart? Where does the line from the panel hook to?
Please Help me!:
 
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Old 11-10-07, 05:23 PM
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Line means the power wires. Load means what is being powered.

I assume everything you bought is 240 volts. A 240 volt breaker, a 240 volt thermostat, and a 240 volt heater.

At the thermostat connect the two power wires to the LINE terminals. Connect the two wires to heater to the LOAD terminals.

You should have the same number of wires at each end of the heater. Follow the directions that came with the heater to wire it.
 
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Old 11-10-07, 05:28 PM
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Can you be specific as to what the difference is between line and load wires?
one goes to the source (line) and the other goes to the appliance (load) ( I know, very funny)

Is the heater 120 volt or 240 volt?

is there a wiring diagram either in any associated literature or within the wiring junction box or on a cover somewhere?

There may or may not be any indication of line and load on the t-stat. If there is, the red and the black indicated as line are where you hook up the two hot wires from your panel. The other two wires hook up to the heater.

Take note, in a lot of the heaters I have installed, the have a wire joint in the opposite end that needs to be checked. It is set up so youcould wire the t-state into either end.
 
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Old 11-10-07, 05:55 PM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
Line means the power wires. Load means what is being powered.

I assume everything you bought is 240 volts. A 240 volt breaker, a 240 volt thermostat, and a 240 volt heater.

At the thermostat connect the two power wires to the LINE terminals. Connect the two wires to heater to the LOAD terminals.

You should have the same number of wires at each end of the heater. Follow the directions that came with the heater to wire it.
The directions are unclear. T t-stat does say that the red is the line and Black is the load. So I connect the two reds to the power/panel and the two blacks to the baseboard unit's black and red? Is this correct?
 
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Old 11-10-07, 05:58 PM
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Ok, But...

Originally Posted by nap View Post
one goes to the source (line) and the other goes to the appliance (load) ( I know, very funny)

Is the heater 120 volt or 240 volt?

is there a wiring diagram either in any associated literature or within the wiring junction box or on a cover somewhere?

There may or may not be any indication of line and load on the t-stat. If there is, the red and the black indicated as line are where you hook up the two hot wires from your panel. The other two wires hook up to the heater.

Take note, in a lot of the heaters I have installed, the have a wire joint in the opposite end that needs to be checked. It is set up so youcould wire the t-state into either end.
The directions are unclear. However, the t-stat does say that the red is the line and Black is the load. So, should I connect the two reds to the power/panel and the two blacks to the baseboard unit's black and red? Is this correct?
 
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Old 11-11-07, 01:01 PM
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NOOO!!

Sorry about that. all the t-stats I remember wiring used one red and one black for the line and one red and one black for the load.

If yours says that red is line and black is load then hook it up that way. (even that coloration is contrary to what I typically encounter)


hook each red to one of the hots from the panel and each black to one of the leads to the heater.


(this is 240 volt correct?)

Just out of curiosity, do you have a continuity tester or an ohmmeter? I would really like to test the t-stat just to be sure.
 
 

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