Electric dryer vs. gas these days

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Old 11-13-07, 01:18 PM
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Electric dryer vs. gas these days

probably not the best forum, but I know who's opinions on this forum I trust.

Getting some front loader washer/dryer. I'm redoing the bathroom (it was horrible, had to rebuild the foundation under an existing structure, found an electrocuted squirrel that had muched on K&T decades ago).

I'm running electric and gas to the room either way. But does it make sense these days to buy a gas dryer?
 
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Old 11-13-07, 01:24 PM
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Of course it makes sense to buy a gas dryer. A gas dryer, while it costs more to buy, costs less to run. It will pay for itself in savings verses an electric one over the life of the dryer.
 
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Old 11-13-07, 03:34 PM
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There's one of the opinons I wanted.

Ibpooks/Ben, you around?

And keep in mind this is cost of operation with natural gas getting so expensive. I realize that an electric element is 100% efficient, but gas is cheaper per btu...at least the last time I looked.
 
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Old 11-13-07, 04:07 PM
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I don't know if this would be true for a dryer bought today but I have a friend that is still using her gas dryer that she had when she lived in California.

She moved to Washington at least twenty-five years ago.
 
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Old 11-13-07, 05:41 PM
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There is not much too a dryer, especially an older model that does not have the electronic controls and all the fancy stuff.

My wife and I ended up with two electric dryers, one with each house we bought. We gave one away that was old, but still worked great, and we finally gave the other one to the refugee resettlement program when we got tired of the high electric bills and bought a gas model.


I did a quick Google search and found articles stating that the break even point is between 300 and 400 loads in the dryer. Obviously there are many variables that effect this, but this means that if you dry an average of 4 loads per week, you pay for the difference in purchase cost inside of two years. The difference in purchase cost is about 50 to 60 dollars (does not include installation of a gas line or an electric line). That means if you keep your gas dryer long enough, it pays for itself verses if you were still using an electric model in about ten years total.
 
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Old 11-13-07, 06:55 PM
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Gas will always be more efficient. After all, they have to burn something to make the electricity.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 09:33 AM
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I'd go with a gas dryer -- it's cheaper to operate even with high gas prices. A good portion of the electricity in the US is generated from burning natural gas, so the higher price of gas is reflected in higher electricity prices also.

There's a bit of local bias too. For example, here in mid-Michigan about 95% of the homes use natural gas or propane as a primary energy source so gas appliances are more abundant in the stores and home buyers expect gas hookups for ranges and dryers. Other areas of the country have more electric-only homes, so gas hookups wouldn't be as big of a deal.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 09:56 AM
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and there's the other opinion

Thank you all for the help. The difference in price is actually going to be nill because I found out a tricky way to get the best price.

I found that the sale prices you get from L---, BBuy, Borg, etc is still with a huge markup. There is so much margin on appliances, you would not believe it. So I found an online place that starts w/ Aj, that actually had some decent prices. I brought that in and all the sudden, the big boys went hundreds below their best 10% off deals + 15% off friends and family deals (I'm talking to you Sears!).

I ended up going with the Maytag store because they actually BEAT the internet price.

Not here trying to advertise, just trying to give back those who gave me some good advice.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 01:01 PM
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There one thing it may overlook but what i know and i heard that the gas dryer do have slightly more powerfull heating than electric dryer BTU's wise.

the most common electric dryers useally run about 22 amp [ typically 4.5 -5.5 KW area and which that translated to roughly about 25,000 BTU range while the gas dryer can go high as 30,000 some case 40,000 BTU [ but for that much heating power the dryer vent must be a metal ductwork type not those crappy vinal vent type *most codes required metal duct anyway regaurding if eletric or gas fired dryer ]

Merci, Marc
 
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Old 11-30-07, 07:12 PM
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Fuel -> elecricity

At best, coal energy can be converted to electricity at 33% efficiency. For a natural gas turbine, it is about 45%. You can lose up to 7% of the electrical energy through transmission and distribution. A cheap water heater is 58% efficient, so, a combustion appliance will always be more efficient (unless all your electricity is from renewables). Propane and natural gas produce much less carbon dioxide than coal for the same amount of heat. I know someone with a propane dryer that just uses 20 lb tanks, each one lasts 4 months or so. Running gas lines can be expensive though, I've heard quotes of $12/foot.
 
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Old 11-30-07, 07:33 PM
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Strategery,

Careful. For a clean burning combustion device (natural gas, propane) your comments are mostly true. But for oil products (heating oil, diesel fuel, gasoline) this is less true.

When a vehicle engine needs a tune up and when an oil burner gets dirty, the efficiency goes down quickly. Very few people keep their car tuned up as they should, and too many people go too long between cleaning their oil burners.
 
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Old 11-30-07, 07:39 PM
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True

Not a lot of people use oil heat in my area, so you don't hear much about it. Open flame for cooking is probably less efficent than a heating element. Sorry for being so general.
 
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