110 and 220 in subpanel


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Old 11-14-07, 08:59 AM
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110 and 220 in subpanel

I've just installed a subpanel. It is connected to the main panel via #6 wire into a 60 amp double pole circuit breaker. I've connected the two hot wires to the hot buses and the white to the neutral bar. I got a separate grounding strip which I've connected all the ground wires to.

I have 2 questions:

1) Is #6 wire ok for a 60 amp circuit or do I need to only use a 50 amp circuit breaker?

2) Of the three circuits I installed in the subpanel, two work fine, but the other has 220 volt current going through it, which is NOT what I want. It appears that every other circuit in the panel (it is a square D 100 amp panel with 6 circuits) is 110 and every other one is 220. Is this because I wired something wrong or is this just the way the panel is set up and I need to only use the 110's.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 09:23 AM
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I think you are measuring wrong, at least I hope so. The only way to get 240 volts is to measure between the hot legs. If you measure 240 volts, then the other side of your measuring point is tied to the other hot leg.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 09:43 AM
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I got a separate grounding strip which I've connected all the ground wires to.
You do have a fourth green wire from the main panel to that green grounding strip don't you? You have removed the bonding screw or strap from the neutral. You don't mention that in your post.

While the above doesn't address your question it is a safety issue raised by your post. Measure with an analog meter between each hot leg
and the neutral and you should get approximately 120-126v. Is this a receptacle that has the wrong voltage? You do have the black to the breaker and white to the neutral?
 
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Old 11-14-07, 09:59 AM
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It appears that every other circuit in the panel (it is a square D 100 amp panel with 6 circuits) is 110 and every other one is 220.
The exact symptoms of a subpanel wired interchanging the neutral with one of the hots. You have connected one hot and a neutral to your two bus bars, and the other hot to your neutral bar. I'll bet if you measure the voltage from what you currently think is the neutral to ground, you'll find 120 volts there. That's because what you think is the neutral is one of the hots.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 10:05 AM
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Originally Posted by steve587 View Post
I've just installed a subpanel. It is connected to the main panel via #6 wire into a 60 amp double pole circuit breaker. I've connected the two hot wires to the hot buses and the white to the neutral bar. I got a separate grounding strip which I've connected all the ground wires to.

I have 2 questions:

1) Is #6 wire ok for a 60 amp circuit or do I need to only use a 50 amp circuit breaker?

2) Of the three circuits I installed in the subpanel, two work fine, but the other has 220 volt current going through it, which is NOT what I want. It appears that every other circuit in the panel (it is a square D 100 amp panel with 6 circuits) is 110 and every other one is 220. Is this because I wired something wrong or is this just the way the panel is set up and I need to only use the 110's.

Steve,

1.) Depends alot on the type of conductor you ran as well as the type of raceway method. If you ran SE and copper then you are fine. If you ran SE and Aluminum then you will need that mighty 50A breaker. If you happen to run lets say NM Cable ( 4 conductors we hope ) then that changes it a bit also....really depends on what you ran.

2.) I agree with RAC on this...either you are measuring wrong or did not supply the " remote distribution panel" with the proper wiring method needed to achieve a 120/240 setup.

And YES.....the "sub" panel should as RAY correctly stated should have a floating ( isolated, not in contact with the metal enclosure by removing the bonding strip or main bonding jumper ) "grounded" or in this case safe to say " neutral" bar.... You will need a seperate grounding bar as well....indeed you will indeed need to run (4) conductors and the 4th being the "equipment grounding conductor " to this panel....unless of course you ran EMT or something and that would be the 4th "TECHNICAL" conductor if done properly.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 12:48 PM
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<The exact symptoms of a subpanel wired interchanging the neutral with one of the hots. You have connected one hot and a neutral to your two bus bars, and the other hot to your neutral bar. I'll bet if you measure the voltage from what you currently think is the neutral to ground, you'll find 120 volts there. That's because what you think is the neutral is one of the hots.>

Double check the wiring 3 more times......

I have a 6 space 100amp SQ-D panel also, and can tell you it is "SIMPLE" to mix up the Neutral and hot on the "RIGHT HAND" side of the box. Especially since it only affects Every Other breaker. In theory, The breakers that work properly are the ones that are miswired.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 07:21 PM
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thanks for your help

The initial set of responses from you all were quite helpful. The most recent response describes exactly what the issue was, which I'd corrected earlier this afternoon. I was running one of the two hot wires to the neutral bar and the white wire to one of the two hot bars. Once I reversed them, all was fine, and my only harm was the loss of a light bulb, which didn't appreciate a burst of 220 volts. The instructions are written for a large number of different panels, so the wiring diagram was not too helpful, but it's not a mistake I'll make again.

Thanks again for your help.
 
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Old 11-14-07, 07:30 PM
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If this was a subpanel, why didn't the subfeed breaker trip when the hot phase was connected to the neutral?
Something doesn't jive here.
 
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Old 11-15-07, 02:45 AM
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Originally Posted by dezwit View Post
If this was a subpanel, why didn't the subfeed breaker trip when the hot phase was connected to the neutral?
Something doesn't jive here.
Subpanel has the neutral Isolated from Ground. The Reversed wiring fed the first hot to the neutral bar, the opposing hot to the buss bar, and neutral to opposing buss bar.

The 2 110 outlets that worked had the hot and neutral reversed. The breaker on the opposing leg was fed a hot by the neutral wire, combined with the hot wire from the bussbar.
 
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Old 11-15-07, 05:21 AM
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Steve,

Lets not forget the following:

200.6 Means of Identifying Grounded Conductors.
(A) Sizes 6 AWG or Smaller. An insulated grounded conductor
of 6 AWG or smaller shall be identified by a continuous
white or gray outer finish or by three continuous
white stripes on other than green insulation along its entire
length. Wires that have their outer covering finished
show a white or gray color but have colored tracer threads
in the braid identifying the source of manufacture shall
considered as meeting the provisions of this section.

If you simply ran all " BLACK" conductors let say..then that is where the mixing can take place....remember 6AWG and smaller must meet the requirements of 200.6 for future reference because if you ran SE cable for example this should not have been an issue....it will meet compliance in its markings normally to avoide confusion.
 
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Old 11-15-07, 01:49 PM
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Steve-

See post #4 of this thread. I tried to give Mr Nelson the credit he deserved for "Hitting the nailhead" on this one, but the quote somehow got deleted.

As far as Wire colors.. the reference that Electrical man makes, Concerns wiring colors required by electrical code. #6 and smaller require a "WHITE" neutral, and a "GREEN" or "BARE" ground. Larger than #6 wires may be "RE-MARKED" to identify their function.
 
 

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