grounded outlets

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Old 11-18-07, 06:05 PM
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Question grounded outlets

I have no grounded outlets in my kitchen for appliances.
Can I change the old outlets into grounded ones with little knowledge of electrical wiring? If so how do I begin?
 
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Old 11-18-07, 06:13 PM
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No, you cannot change them with little knowledge of electrical wiring.

Now I'll address the question you meant to ask.

In a kitchen you really should have GFCI protected receptacles. I recommend GFCI protection for your receptacles at the very least. This can usually be accomplished by placing one or two GFCI receptacles at the proper location(s) on the circuit(s).

The bonus with doing this is that iut allows you to install three prong receptacles at the other locations on the circuit even if the circuit is not grounded.

However, before doing anything, you need to determine if your kitchen circuits are grounded. This requires investigation on your part. You may be able to figure this out at the main panel, or you may need to open the receptacles and look at the wiring.

If you report back here with the number of circuits feeding your kitchen counter(s), the size (in amps) of those circuits, whether or not those circuits are grounded and a complete listing of what is on those circuits we can go from there.
 
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Old 11-19-07, 10:46 PM
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ground wire

If found that the ground wire is not installed, then what can I do? we need to install groung wire in circuit breaker then replace the GFCI Breaker or just install GFCI receptacle?

???
 
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Old 11-20-07, 04:20 AM
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Some appliances need a ground wire to operate properly. Others do no. For the most part it is items with electronics, like microwave ovens, that need a neutral.
 
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Old 11-20-07, 01:04 PM
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read

I post questions then I saw some replied, but I can not know
where can I find reply post to read??
If you know how to read reply, please let me know by email me
to private email or email me at [email address removed]
Thanks

365south
 

Last edited by racraft; 11-20-07 at 01:53 PM. Reason: email addresses not allowed in posts
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Old 11-20-07, 04:58 PM
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The problem is that you have resurrected 10+ old threads that mentioned anything having to do with "GFCI" or "grounding" and added duplicate questions in each one. It's not surprising that you are having a hard time locating such replies.

The email notification you got should have a link to each thread though.

I would encourage you to start a new thread and ask your question there.

-core
 
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Old 11-21-07, 01:12 PM
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How can I put in new thread

Thank for your replied
but how can I put in new thread??
log in
then
find in elctrical forum
then search
or new post
I am soory, I am lost
Please show me
Thanks
 
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Old 11-21-07, 04:41 PM
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First navigate to the electrical forum:
http://forum.doityourself.com/forumdisplay.php?f=131

Then on that page there is a big button in the upper left area of the page that says "New Post". That's all.

If you can't seem to see it here's the direct link:
http://forum.doityourself.com/newthr...=newthread&f=9

[Edit: nevermind, looks like you figured it out.]
 
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Old 11-22-07, 01:01 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
Some appliances need a ground wire to operate properly. Others do no. For the most part it is items with electronics, like microwave ovens, that need a neutral.
From time to time, this pops up. Grounding has been more and more common during the evolution of electric supply.

In Europe the ground is clled earth or protective earth (PE)

We have got GFCI multiple pole breakers, etc.
Moast appliances has robust electronics who copes with bad grounding, so the main issue is to protect people from electric schock.
Grounding is mainly chosen as a standard, because this is easily adopted to moast appliancs and copes with changes in equipment and consumers respect for electricity.

The first grounding was done by using the conduits, multiple boundings between ground and grounded. Later a smaller ground wire, now a full dimention ground wire, and even an extra for separate grounding only bonded to ground at one point. (All this is depending on regional/national codes and at what time it is buildt)

A gfci will probably be able to save lives if an error occurs.
I know cloekner- moeller (mabe others too) has made a combined breaker/GFCI who's not bigger than the breaker alone, and this is used more and more here in Norway.

dsk
 
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Old 11-22-07, 02:00 AM
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new post

Originally Posted by core View Post
First navigate to the electrical forum:
http://forum.doityourself.com/forumdisplay.php?f=131

Then on that page there is a big button in the upper left area of the page that says "New Post". That's all.

If you can't seem to see it here's the direct link:
http://forum.doityourself.com/newthr...=newthread&f=9

[Edit: nevermind, looks like you figured it out.]
Thank you very much, Core
I understand now
Happy Thanksgiving day
 
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