Forward-thinking strategy for wiring a subpanel


  #1  
Old 11-27-07, 09:20 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Forward-thinking strategy for wiring a subpanel

Hi all,

I just bought an all-electric house with a 200A main panel. Unfortunately it's totally full and there are no more slots available. It's a GE from 1976 but I can't figure out what model number it is. It's filled up with skinny TQP breakers.

Anyway, we're putting a little kitchenette into the basement and there's only a 20A circuit and a 15A circuit down there (one's for the plugs and the other's for the lighting). We need some more juice so I was thinking about putting a 50 or 60A subpanel down there -- but there's no space for a feeder breaker in the main panel since all the breakers are the skinny kind and I can't double them up with tandem breakers.

So I could remove a skinny 20A breaker that feeds a broken disposal we don't use, maybe connect the two basement circuits into a basement subpanel, and somehow figure out how to remove one more circuit somewhere (or maybe combine two that aren't really used much) to make space for the feeder breaker.

But now I'm wondering.... I could free up a LOT of space if I put all the heaters onto one 80A subpanel. There are 4 20A double pole breakers for the baseboard heaters.

Would that be a wise option? That would also free up some space if I eventually decide to build a garage and want to wire it up.

Any suggestions?
 
  #2  
Old 11-27-07, 09:33 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,970
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I recommend that you pick one 240 volt circuit or two 120 volt circuits and move the circuit(s) to the sub panel. Pick circuits where the existing cabling is positioned such that it will route into the new sub panel without needing to be lengthened.
 
  #3  
Old 11-27-07, 10:25 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Nov 2007
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I think for the kitchenette I'll need a 20A 240v circuit for the burner, a 20A circuit for the fridge and microwave, and a 20A circuit for the toaster oven/receptacles.

So if I move a 240v circuit from the main breaker to the kitchenette subpanel, I'll need 4 20v circuits down there. I'll also only have space for a skinny two-pole breaker.

What kind of feeder breaker can I use that will fit and will still work for all the electrical needs that'll be in the subpanel? I didn't think they made skinny breakers that're bigger than 50A...

Thanks
Nathan
 
  #4  
Old 11-27-07, 10:37 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Sep 2003
Location: Central New York State
Posts: 13,970
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Decide how mu8ch power you want at the sub panel. Buy a breaker the correct sizer and make for your panel. If necessary move more than one 240 volt breaker to the sub panel.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: