Wiring a new shop

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Old 11-28-07, 05:44 PM
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Talking Wiring a new shop

Hello Gentlemen(and women where applicable)!!
My son has asked me to install a new 200 amp electrical service in his new 30x32 shop. I am going to use 3/4 EMT. I am planning on having three separate banks of 20 amp outlets-each containing 12 outlets each. I am going to use GFCI Breakers. Every other outlet will be GFCI protected. I am planning on using THHN 12 and run separate neutrals for each separate leg. There will be ceiling lighting and that also will be thru EMT using THHN 12 (sodium vapor lamps(2)).
There will be three 50 amp outlets for welders(never will all three be used at the same time). I am planning on using #6 stranded copper for these outlets.

I am just wondering if I have all of the bases covered. I have done a lot of residential wiring but because this is a shop. I wanted to use the EMT as a safety measure.

Does it all sound ok???

Thanks!!!
 

Last edited by Sparky2007; 11-28-07 at 07:19 PM. Reason: wrong wording
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Old 11-28-07, 06:18 PM
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One time at band camp .....




I'd replace "hired" with something sans money.

Like "I am helping my son "
 
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Old 11-28-07, 06:52 PM
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Welders have special provisions in the NEC so it may be better to call them "special purpose" receptacles. I kind of doubt that the inspector will allow you to "daisy chain" them but will insist that they be individual branch circuits regardless of how they are intended to be used.

I strongly suggest that you run an equipment grounding conductor along with the branch circuit conductors through the EMT. Be sure to pigtail a ground to all metal enclosures.
 
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Old 11-28-07, 07:10 PM
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Originally Posted by furd View Post
I strongly suggest that you run an equipment grounding conductor along with the branch circuit conductors through the EMT. Be sure to pigtail a ground to all metal enclosures.
The steel pipe not good enough? Just make sure you tighten all screws. And yes, pigtail ground from box to outlet if using industrial covers.

I would use GFCI outlets instead of breakers. Just wire them using the line and load and you will protect the circuit down from the first one. It will save you And your son a TON on money.
 
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Old 11-28-07, 07:12 PM
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One GFCI receptacle per circuit will provide the same protection for a fraction of the cost of a GFCI breaker.

You asked if you had all the bases covered. You may have, but there are still a few hundred things that you might do wrong in the unstated details. If you have it inspected (and I'm sure you will), it will mitigate much of the risk.

Unless you are a licensed electrician, it's probably illegal for you to do this work for your son. As burke implied, I suggest you regard this as your son's job on which you are providing substantial help.
 
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Old 11-29-07, 08:23 AM
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To avoid the complications with installing multiple welder receptacles, you could just install one centrally located and make or buy a 50' extension cord for the welder for the times you need it around the shop.
 
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Old 11-29-07, 03:53 PM
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Talking Rgw GFI's

He already bought two GFI breakers...both 20 amp. I was going to wire 4 on one , 4 one the other. That should afford enough protection. I am not going to daisy chain the "special use outlets", they will have dedicated 50 amp breakers....As for being licensed , it is not required here where I live. The initial service entrance has been inspected and the inspector, and being a friend of mine, he will come and check it all out when it is done. He will give me a compliance certificate should somewhere down the road, the town requires. Thanks for the input.
 

Last edited by Sparky2007; 11-29-07 at 03:55 PM. Reason: puncuation
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Old 11-29-07, 06:07 PM
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In most places, a license is not required to do electrical work on a home you both own and occupy. But I've never heard of a location where anybody can do anything anywhere.
 
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Old 11-29-07, 06:51 PM
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My experience

I have been doing residential electrical work for over 25 years. I am the electrician on record for several service upgrades and renovations with the local utility company. The town that I reside in DOES NOT require a licensed electrician to do the work when a Licensed inspector verifies the safety of the work before a C/O is issued.
There are cities in the area that DO require that a licensed CONTRACTING firm do the work but the electricians working for that firm DO NOT themselves have to be licensed.
Unfortunately, New York State doesn't have an electrician's licensing program but HOME INSPECTORs MUST be licensed by the State. IN my personal opinion, there needs to be a state licensing program for anyone who does amy kind of electrical work for profit.
 
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