Kitchen circuit issues

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Old 12-02-07, 01:39 PM
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Kitchen circuit issues

My kitchen though recently wired by the previous owner only has one 20A circuit for small appliances on the countertops. In addition, there is one receptacle on one wall along the floorline that is connected to the separate kitchen lighting circuit, serving the kitchen, and an adjacent hall space's lighting and receptacle.

I see two code violations here in that 1) there is only a single 20A small appliance circuit and 2) there is a receptacle on a kitchen wall along the floorline that is not part of this circuit.

These violations do not seem worth fixing.

Now to my real question: can I tap into that kitchen wall receptacle fed from the "lighting circuit" to put an outdoor receptacle on the exterior backing wall? Its on a 20A breaker.
 

Last edited by DavidT; 12-02-07 at 03:11 PM.
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Old 12-02-07, 01:50 PM
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Sounds fine to me. Make sure the receptacle outside is protected by a GFI/GFCI.
 
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Old 12-02-07, 02:29 PM
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Technically no. You cannot make an existing code violation worse.
 
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Old 12-02-07, 03:13 PM
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Are we obligated to fix existing code violations such as these? Not sure how this passed inspection to begin with... when doing a full-rewire (as prev owner did) doesn't one have to bring all to current code?

Now, assuming I can find a reasonable way to get that one wall receptacle on the small appliance circuit, would it then be OK to hook into the kitchen lighting circuit for the outdoor receptacle?

Thanks!
 
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Old 12-02-07, 03:27 PM
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The most likely explanation is that the job was never inspected.

Did you buy the house knowing this? You could have negotiated that correction of this violation into the purchase offer.

You are not obligated to fix anything until and unless a remodel triggers it.* But by the same token you are not allowed to extend a circuit that is already incorrect and worsen the situation.

Yes, if you remove the kitchen receptacle from this circuit you can extend the circuit outdoors.




* Sometimes certain things must be corrected when a house i sold, but these would be due to local requirements.
 
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Old 12-02-07, 03:42 PM
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Is that one kitchen receptacle currently switched? If so, there is no code violation. If not, but you can easily make it so, that might be the easiest way to technically meet code.
 
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Old 12-02-07, 04:05 PM
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Originally Posted by core View Post
Is that one kitchen receptacle currently switched? If so, there is no code violation. If not, but you can easily make it so, that might be the easiest way to technically meet code.
What are you referring to?
 
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Old 12-02-07, 04:19 PM
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Racraft, are you disagreeing that making the kitchen wall outlet switched would make it within code? The premise, I assume is that it would make that outlet part of the lighting-usage (i.e. for a lamp).

Assuming this helps codewise, to make it switched can it be a receptacle w/ built-in switch or must it be wall-operated?
 
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Old 12-02-07, 04:20 PM
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210.52(B)(1) exception #1.

I'll just post an image right from the 2005 Handbook. Notice the switched receptacle in the kitchen, bottom center:

 
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Old 12-02-07, 04:41 PM
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Interesting idea, but I'm not sure that it works though...

210.52(B)(1) Exc 1 -- In addition to the required receptacles specified by 210.52, switched receptacles supplied from a general-purpose branch circuit as defined in 210.70(A)(1) Exception 1, shall be permitted.

210.70(A)(1) -- In other than kitchens and bathrooms, one or more receptacles controlled by a wall switch shall be permitted in lieu of lighting outlets.


Two problems that I see:
1) The 210.52(B)(1) exception says "in addition to..." so since this is the only receptacle on that wall, we'd still have a violation (i.e. no "regular" receptacle handling the required wall floorline coverage.

2) 210.70(A) exception explicitly forbids application in the kitchen.

I think I will end up making the outside receptacle on a separate circuit that I am installing for other outside receptacles, where I guess it really belongs anyway. No gain in trying to find a convenient shortcut... it was simply that I knew the wire was just sitting there in the wall already.

Thanks to both of you for your help.
 
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Old 12-02-07, 04:45 PM
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True, I did not mean to imply that this would solve your problem of having only one small appliance circuit. But this is not an issue if you are not remodeling the kitchen. (Riiight?) Plus even if you run a new circuit for this floor level receptacle, you will not satisfy the requirements of having 2 small appliance circuits serving the countertop area.


The 210.70(A) exception prohibits such a switched receptacle from being used in lieu of proper lighting outlets in the kitchen. And honestly parts of it seem downright contradictory with the other section when you read them together.

Which is why I posted the image instead of simply citing the code sections. But this case is clearly allowed. Notice they have proper overhead lighting in that sample kitchen, as you probably do.

Edit: And yes, I did fail to factor in the loss of that receptacle with respect to wall area coverage.
 
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Old 12-02-07, 09:41 PM
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Okay, I didn't read this whole thread. But I'll offer a couple of comments.

You are not required to remedy situations that were code-compliant when they were installed. However, I doubt that this was code compliant when installed, in which case you would be required to correct it.

Next, just because you found a circuit that violates code does not mean that you are allowed to create further code violations on the same circuit. That logic is quite a stretch.
 
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