Replacing an standard oulet

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Old 12-11-07, 08:34 PM
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Replacing an standard oulet

Can I connect the line and the load directly to the new oulet without pigtailling??? Thanks for the help... Fer
 
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Old 12-11-07, 08:57 PM
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Be sure the power is off and test the wires before you touch them. You may only put one wire on each screw on the outlet. The white wires go on the silver screws, the black ones go on the brass screws. The bare or green ground wire goes on the single screw below the silver screw (sometimes colored green). You may not need pigtails if you only have 2 black and 2 white wires in the box. You may need a pigtail for the ground wires, and if there are more than 2 black and 2 white wires, you will probably need to use pigtails. Twist the wires together with pliers before you put on the wire nut, and don't use the backstab connections. If this is a GFCI outlet, you need to be very careful that the wires connected to the line terminals on the old outlet are connected to the line terminals on the new outlet; same with the load terminals (read the printing, position of the connections may change). Label and move the wires one at a time if you have and doubts. You should provide more information, and wait for one of the experts to reply.
 
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Old 12-11-07, 09:14 PM
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Replacing a standard outlet

That's correct,there's only 2 black and 2 white plus the grounds. It's the second time I read backstabbing is bad so I will not do that. I'm just curious why they don't usually use the other 2 screws of the outlet instead of pigtailing. Thanks for the help... Fer
 
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Old 12-11-07, 09:19 PM
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Pigtailing makes it easier to remove a device wothout disturbing the circuit or causing a potentially damaging and dangerous situation called an "open neutral".
Our company policy is pigtail only.
 
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Old 12-12-07, 03:54 PM
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Good point. And if you think about it, it is actually one less connection for the devices further on the circuit. (wires connected directly together vs each wire connected to a screw.)
 
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Old 12-12-07, 04:51 PM
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And if it is part of a multi wire circuit, it is against the Code to rely on a device (an outlet) as your neutral connection.
 
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