Government ban on incandescent bulbs

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Old 01-07-08, 09:03 AM
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Government ban on incandescent bulbs

I'm sure everyone heard about the government's ban on incandescent bulbs.

I've noticed around my house that certain fixtures and switches do not work with CFL bulbs. Also, the light from CFLs is so ugly in some applications, like over the kitchen table. Thus, I'm thinking about buying up enough incandescent bulbs to last a while after the ban takes effect. I'm sure a lot of other people will do the same. I'd also imagine there will be a healthy black market for incandescents.

Does anybody know if incandescent bulbs "go bad" after a while? I would think the bulbs would last for decades if stored properly. Thoughts?
 
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Old 01-07-08, 09:41 AM
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I'd also imagine there will be a healthy black market for incandescents.
A perfect trade-off to the bush administrations anti Drug policies. Can you picture Tupac getting smacked around over a light bulb.? Or an NFL player suspended for violating the leauges anti Incandescent policies. Or the thug on the corner being arrested with 30 cases of street grade Bulbs?

Cmon now........
I assume the government will keep a few for themselves though, Seeing how they will need to light up the darkened Caves where Bin Laden is hiding?

Truthfully though...There is no shelf life restriction on bulbs. My dad bought cases of these things from a Going out of buisness sale at a local hardware store. That was about 25 years ago---and there are still plenty of them in the garage... At 2$ a case, he swore he would never buy a light bulb again.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 09:50 AM
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Jim,

If you look hard enough and are willing to pay the going rate, you can find a CFL for your dining room table that will provide the same color and type of light that you wish. When I researched CFLs for my basement recessed lights, I was amazed by the number of different colors and styles of CFLs available.

If (and I'm not sure we will ever see an outright ban) incandescent light bulbs are ever banned it will only serve to speed up the development of and price decreases for CFL bulbs.

Go ahead and buy incandescent bulbs if you want (it's your money) but I wouldn't go hog wild. You may very well end up abandoning them when you first come across a CFL that you can live with.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 09:50 AM
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great article

You can store all the hot filament bulbs in a vacuum. Should last near forever.

CFL's may also be short lived; a flash in the pan. LED won't have the Hg issue, will be cooler. My CFL's don't appear to run all that cool anyhow. Moderately hot to the touch..
 
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Old 01-07-08, 09:59 AM
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Originally Posted by racraft View Post
If (and I'm not sure we will ever see an outright ban) incandescent light bulbs are ever banned it will only serve to speed up the development of and price decreases for CFL bulbs.
I don't see how. Once incandescents are off the market, we'll have no choice but to buy CFLs. Why should CFL makers innovate when their primary competition has been legislated out of existence?

It's worth noting that the biggest backers of this legislation were CFL bulb makers. They will benefit tremendously because the incandescent ban will put all of their low-cost competition (makers of cheap incandescents) out of business. There will be fewer light bulb makers. I don't see how that could lead to lower prices.

Right now, 95% of the market belongs to incandescents. If CFLs are so wonderful, why aren't people buying them?

Personally, I use CFLs in some circumstances, such as exterior lighting. I just don't want to have the choice made for me by the government.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 10:03 AM
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LED won't have the Hg issue, will be cooler
Absolutely true, But where would the lighting market go if you introduced lighting that is virtually indestructible? Ive run leds over with my car, gotten them wet, dropped them , kicked them, But the Only way Ive found to hurt them is incorrect voltage.

I'm all for a good green earth...But isnt this going just a bit too far...????
 
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Old 01-07-08, 10:23 AM
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People don't buy CFLs because of the price and because they don't realize just how far along they are. Many people have bad memories of the first CFLs available years ago.

Competition drives prices down. More manufacturers drives competition. I just noticed my local Ace Hardware advertising GE CFLs. Until I saw the ad, I have never seen or heard of GE making and selling CFLs.

One company will introduce a type or style, and everyone else will copy it.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 10:39 AM
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cfl's

I had to stay out in CA for a few months before I moved to my current home. They sold cfls in grocery/discount stores that are subsidized by PG&E. A dollar for a pack of 3!!! I bought about 4 packs of each type they had. Cheaper than incandecents, last longer, less power required. Wish I had bought 10 packs of each. Guess I'll do that when we go see family in the spring.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 02:27 PM
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I wouldn't be too concerned about this at all. The new rules do not ban incandescent bulbs, they simply require more lumen per watt than is currently common. GE has already announced "advancements to the light bulb that will elevate the energy efficiency to levels comparable to compact fluorescent lamps (CFL)"
 
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Old 01-07-08, 04:31 PM
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I haven't paid more than a buck for a CFL in years. My local (REAL) hardware store puts CFLs on sale several times a year and with the attached utility rebate coupons they cost a buck.

And it isn't even MY serving utility!
 
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Old 01-07-08, 04:51 PM
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You must be in Austrailia, that is the only place I know of that has banned incandescents. There are CFL's that have a warm white color, close to standard lights. They do last as suggested by the tree huggers, but what happens when they finally die and you have to toss out that mercury?????????? Unfortunatly, the tree huggers never think of things like that. A Toyota Prius gets really good gas mileage, good for the enviornment, right??? Do some research on what it costs in enviornmental terms to make the batteries that go into the Prius. You will be shocked.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 05:00 PM
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I like the LED talk, good point with a device damn near indestructible I don't see the big companies going for it too soon.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 05:23 PM
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mercury

The amount of mercury in an improperly disposed of cfl is still less than that produced by the electric generating plants required to power a standard buld for the same estimated life.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 06:07 PM
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I have yet to see an LED that has a color rendition similar to an incandescent.

I like to use CFL's in fixtures that we have on for a long time. Over the kitchen table, entryway etc. I have bought some cheap ones and they either did not last or were poor quality ( slow startup, made noise) I will say the best I have found I got from Home Depot, The Nview brand starts fast, has a color the same as incandescent (2700k) and I have yet needed to change one for about 2 years so far.

here is some good info about the lamps: http://www.rd.com/familyhandyman/content/19708/

The problem is the people who come up with this stuff can not look at the big picture (some was already mentioned above) CFL's have mercury, yes a small amount, but it never goes away. So people will have to pay to dispose of them (add that to the cost) and I'll bet many will end up in the trash. What about halogen? HID lights? Automotive lamps? Xeon lamps? Will they all be banned too? What about people who have medical issues with CFL's? Will they be stuck at home hording their incandescent lamps?

I just don't see it happening.
 
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Old 01-07-08, 07:51 PM
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Government ban on incandescent bulbs

How about LEDs?

They also represent a huge savings in operating costs as the technology improves and the cost comes down. - The new christmas lights are just the beginning.

Operating cost is something that never goes away. Every incandescent bulb gives off hest that can result in more HVAC costs, which is a small but cummulative effect.
 
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Old 01-08-08, 12:14 AM
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What Gunguy45 said is spot on. The only hiccup comes if utilities switch to cleaner generation, which *might* reduce the environmental cost to the point a CFL *might* be more polluting if every one was disposed of improperly. One thing to remember with this is that CFL waste is relatively very low, since you're replacing bulbs once every few years, instead of every few months/1 year/etc.

Another consideration is that CFL disposal is getting much easier to find. My municipality will take them for free, and I've heard some Home Depot/Lowes places accept them as well, though I haven't looked into this myself since I have a free local alternative. I have to get rid of hearing aid batteries (on the order of three 675sp's a day) so it's not a big deal for me. One way to look at it might be this: any CFL that's disposed of properly can only INCREASE the savings over traditional power pollution - it does not CAUSE the savings itself. That's done by the large reduction in power/heat, by and large, as I understand it.

LED's are still temperamental. The Christmas lights are really the first large-scale application I've seen in a "traditional lighting" use, and I haven't really gotten up close to any yet. I have seen LED light bulbs, and the colors were still off. There are "nicer" ones available online, but the prices are still pretty shocking - I think LED will be the "CFL of the future" when we're all using CFL's.

That said, I can't wait to see what advancements are yet to come... My only worry is that bulb makers will raise prices artificially if they discover anything *too* good!
 
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