Drilling Holes

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Old 01-10-08, 06:57 AM
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Drilling Holes

This might be an odd question...but what are you guys using to drill holes in studs to run wire? I have a 5/8" auger style bit that is short and stubby so I can get my regular drill inbetween two studs. However, my 19.2 volt battery drill and my regular 3/8" corded drill barely have enough power to drill the hole in each stud.

I'm working in a house built around 1915 and I know that putting screws into the studs is harder than new studs but I would think that I could still drill holes alright.

I have a fair number of holes to drill and I don't want to burn out my drills. So, what do those of you that do this every day use?

Thanks,

Brad
 
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Old 01-10-08, 07:16 AM
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Drill

A Milwaukee corded right-angle drill has plenty of power to do the job. Also fits between the studs to allow drilling a perpendicular hole. Pricey but top quality. Hope this helps.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 07:33 AM
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If you can stage your project properly, rent a corded right angle drill for few hours.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 07:54 AM
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Milwaukee right-angle drill with either an auger bit or a bit with a sort-of flat end, I can't remember what it's called. It would be worth renting the right angle drill for a day instead of using a cordless hand held. The biggest advantage with the right-angle drill is that there's enough room behind it to use your leg or knee to push and support the drill instead of all the force on your wrists.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 08:46 AM
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use a 5/8" spade bit instead



the auger type bits are meant for heavy duty drills or gear reduction type drills
 
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Old 01-10-08, 08:55 AM
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I agree with Brewaholic - It's not your drill, it's the bit. Use a new spade bit. Cut the shank shorter if needed to get in narrow stud bays. The bit may dull after a while so be prepared to replace it when it starts to bog down.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 12:35 PM
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Bits

I prefer auger bits in old, seasoned wood. However, the choice is debateable. The main thing is to use a sharp bit as already stated. Spade bits can be sharpened with a file or a Dremel tool. Auger bits can also be sharpened. Good luck with your project.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 12:44 PM
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There are also quick cut special spade bits. They are thicker and heavier then regular ones. They leave a bit rougher hole but cut very quick. While I have never had much luck with resharpening regular spade bits I found that I could dress these with a file and they would again work well.

For about $20 you can get a right angle attachment for your regular drill. I would never attempt this with a battery drill, not in old growth timber.
 
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Old 01-10-08, 12:58 PM
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Greenlee "Nail-Eater" bits -----
 
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Old 01-10-08, 03:47 PM
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if you made your living roughing stick frame houses, this is what you'd use

1/2" hole hawg



18" nail eater auger bits
 
 

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