110 outlet to 120 outlet

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  #1  
Old 01-21-08, 12:30 PM
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110 outlet to 120 outlet

I tried to install a 120 outlet at an existing 110 outlet. I connected the black wires to brass and the white wires to silver.

On the back of the 110 outlet there was one black and one white wire installed into the back of the existing outlet.

When I installed the 120 outlet I took the extra white wire and used it as a ground wire and I capped off the extra black wire.

When I turned the main breaker back on the outlet didn't work.

Any suggestions on what I'm doing wrong?
 
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Old 01-21-08, 12:41 PM
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I am not sure where you got the 110 and 120 device reference but I am guessing you mean an older receptacle with no ground and a newer one with the ground connection on it.
You can't use the white wire as a ground wire, you must use the bare ground wire or green wire that was already there if the receptacle did not have a ground to begin with you are suppose to use a GFI receptacle marked as having no ground
It sounds as if the extra white and black wires were actually the feed wires which need to be connected to the receptacle. If in the previous version the two blacks and two whites went to the receptacle then they must be connected in the same manner to get the device to work. .

Although changing a receptacle sounds very simple there are a few things you must consider and understand or the installation may not be safe for the one installing the device or the people living in the house.

I would recommend you take a little while and read some basic books on the subject, this suggestion is for the safety of your property and family.
 
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Old 01-21-08, 12:42 PM
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Originally Posted by floreenj View Post
I tried to install a 120 outlet at an existing 110 outlet. I connected the black wires to brass and the white wires to silver.

On the back of the 110 outlet there was one black and one white wire installed into the back of the existing outlet.

When I installed the 120 outlet I took the extra white wire and used it as a ground wire and I capped off the extra black wire.

When I turned the main breaker back on the outlet didn't work.

Any suggestions on what I'm doing wrong?
From your description I'm not certain what you are trying to do.

For starters, what is the difference between what you are describing as "110V and "120V" outlets.
 
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Old 01-21-08, 12:42 PM
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110, 115, 120 volts is all the same thing as far as home electric is concerned.

You need to connect the ground wire to the ground screw. Do NOT connect the white wire to the green ground screw. If you don't have ground wire(green or bare) then you need to be using a GFCI receptacle and leave nothing connected to the ground screw.
To actually fix your problem you need to connect all the black wires together with a short 6 inch pigtail piece of black wire of the same gauge as the rest of the wires using a wire nut. Then connect the pigtail to one of the gold screws.
Do the same thing for the white wires and connect the pigtail to the silver screw.
 
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Old 01-21-08, 12:56 PM
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I have no idea what you actually did, except that it was wrong.

You cannot legally extend an ungrounded circuit, so if the existing receptacle had no ground then you cannot extend the circuit.

If the circuit did have a ground, or the box is properly grounded, then to extend the circuit you simply connect all black wires together and all white wires together (assuming there is no switch involved which might change things).

By the way, never ever use the back stab connectors. These are the Push In type connectors I think you are describing. These are prone to failure over time. Instead use the screw terminals.
 
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Old 01-21-08, 05:34 PM
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Whoa I can't belive I just read that you connected a neutral wire to a ground screw.


Stop and pick up the phone book and pick an electrician please.
 
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Old 01-22-08, 07:26 AM
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Originally Posted by joed View Post
Do the same thing for the white wires and connect the pigtail to the silver screw.
Should not even do that, unless all the circuits passing through the box have been traced back to their originating breaker or fuse - one of more of those might be for a shared-neutral ("multi-wire") circuit, if so it should not be connected to the grounded conductors of other circuits.
 
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Old 01-22-08, 09:38 AM
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Originally Posted by Michael Thomas View Post
Should not even do that, unless all the circuits passing through the box have been traced back to their originating breaker or fuse - one of more of those might be for a shared-neutral ("multi-wire") circuit, if so it should not be connected to the grounded conductors of other circuits.
Based on the orginal posters description of how they were previously connected to the receptacle they SHOULD all be connected together in this case.
 
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