Small Appliance Branch Circuits

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Old 01-24-08, 12:25 PM
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Question Small Appliance Branch Circuits

I have been having a fight with the guy's at Habitat for Humanity. In the past we have always wired the kitchen with power coming to the first GFI in the kitchen, and the 20 amp recp. flowing out from there, going to the dinning room to supply power to that room. In this new development they are bring power to the dining room first and then to the kitchen. and putting the GFI in the kitchen, and not protecting the dinning room with a GFI. I know that it can be done this way, but if a SABC is the starting point of power, does it not make sense to start in the kitchen? The code book in my interpretation tell you do do it that way, but some people are not interpreting it like that. Please your thoughts on this.
 
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Old 01-24-08, 12:41 PM
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It makes no difference whether the circuit goes first to the dining room and then to the kitchen or first to the kitchen and then to the dining room. GFCI protection is not required in the dining room (but it can be provided) but it is required in the kitchen, for the counter top receptacles.
 
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Old 01-24-08, 12:42 PM
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I think you need to clarify what kitchen circuit you are talking about. Since you've said 20 amp, I'll assume you don't mean the lighting.

Kitchen countertops need two 20amp GFCI protected receptacles, usually done with a shared neutral. They can serve no other purpose.
 
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Old 01-24-08, 03:51 PM
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According to the 2008 NEC practically everything is required to be GFCI protected. (If not AFCI protected) So if your area already adopted the 08' code, it is required that all the receptacles be GFCI protected.

Just another thought...
 
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Old 01-24-08, 04:56 PM
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We are under the 2005 codes, and I understand they have gotten some what ridicules in there requirements. What are your thoughts on the subject of small appliance branch circuits, serving the dinning room. If you look at 210.52(B)
(1) it talks about the SABC serving the dinning room, it does not talk about the dinning room serving the kitchen. I know you can wire it many way's, but how do you interpret it, and the rest of you folks. You may also look at 210.11(C)(1), and go back and forth
 
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Old 01-24-08, 10:10 PM
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It makes no difference whether the circuit goes first to the dining room or first to the kitchen. Why would it?
 
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Old 01-24-08, 10:37 PM
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It would make a difference if you wanted the dinning room, to be GFI protected. I maintain that the code is written so you wire the kitchen first because it is GFI protected and all circuits down line from there are also protected. If you think of a branch circuit starting at the CB panel, and the kitchen has to have two branch circuits, if this a true statement than you cannot start in any room you want to too wire the kitchen, just like you cannot put any 20 amp circuit to power the dinning room.
 
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Old 01-25-08, 01:32 AM
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If you want the dining room to be GFCI protected and it is first on the circuit then put the GFCI receptacle in the dining room.

I don;t know what you are having trouble understanbding, but the code is quite clear and not at all confusing, at least not in this area.

The small appliance circuits cannot serve anything except the kitchen receptacles, and receptacles in the dining room, pantry and breakfast nook. Nothing else in the house. Period.
 
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