Dedicated circuit

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Old 01-28-08, 07:15 AM
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Dedicated circuit

I have a house built in the 1950's and I have a friend who is going to run a new grounded circuit to our new LCD tv. What supplies will I need? The TV sits above the breaker box so running it will not take too much.
 
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Old 01-28-08, 07:25 AM
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Correction. You will run a new circuit to your new TV. Your friend will assist you. Your friend, unless he or she is an electrician probably cannot legally do the work for you.

The above distinction is extremely important. Don;t underestimate it.


First, I recommend that you buy and read the book Wiring Simplified. This book will outline the steps necessary for the job, and it will outline the supplies needed. Your friend should also be able to help you decide on the supplies.

You need a circuit breaker made for your circuit breaker panel. if you have an unused 120 volt breaker, you can probably use it. I recommend a 20 amp circuit.

You need 12 gage cable or wire and conduit. If cable is allowed where you live, then go with NM 12-2. The NM stands for non-metallic. The cable will have three conductors. One black insulated, one white insulated, and one bare ground. If cable is not allowed where you live then you need conduit and wire. The wire will be THHN (may also be rated THWN). You will need three lengths, one black or other dark (not green) solid color, one white and one bare or green insulated.

You need a junction box. If the wall is intact use an old work box. If the wall is open but will be finished then use a nail on box. You can also buy a surface mount box if appropriate. The box can be metal or plastic. Buy the largest single gang box that will fit.

If attempting to install in an existing wall you will need a way to make the hole in the drywall. They sell handles that accept a hacksaw blade that work very well. You will also need wire strippers and various screw drivers.

You need a duplex receptacle. Make it a 15 amp duplex receptacle. I recommend against the bulk cheap ones. Commercial grade are more expensive, but are better quality.

You need a cover plate for the receptacle. The style will depend on the box used.

Remember that electricity can and does kill people. You can kill yourself just by taking the cover off the main panel, if you make a mistake. I suggest that all work in the main panel be done with the main breaker turned OFF, and with your non-dominant hand tied behind your back. If you use two hands and get 120 or 240 volts between them, you will likely kill yourself.

Plan the entire job first, before making any holes or running any cables. Start early so you are not ruished for time and so you have daylight available, and so that you can go back to the store to get the items you forgot.
 
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Old 01-28-08, 08:10 AM
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What if I don't have room in my breaker box for a new breaker, what then?


Originally Posted by racraft View Post
Correction. You will run a new circuit to your new TV. Your friend will assist you. Your friend, unless he or she is an electrician probably cannot legally do the work for you.

The above distinction is extremely important. Don;t underestimate it.


First, I recommend that you buy and read the book Wiring Simplified. This book will outline the steps necessary for the job, and it will outline the supplies needed. Your friend should also be able to help you decide on the supplies.

You need a circuit breaker made for your circuit breaker panel. if you have an unused 120 volt breaker, you can probably use it. I recommend a 20 amp circuit.

You need 12 gage cable or wire and conduit. If cable is allowed where you live, then go with NM 12-2. The NM stands for non-metallic. The cable will have three conductors. One black insulated, one white insulated, and one bare ground. If cable is not allowed where you live then you need conduit and wire. The wire will be THHN (may also be rated THWN). You will need three lengths, one black or other dark (not green) solid color, one white and one bare or green insulated.

You need a junction box. If the wall is intact use an old work box. If the wall is open but will be finished then use a nail on box. You can also buy a surface mount box if appropriate. The box can be metal or plastic. Buy the largest single gang box that will fit.

If attempting to install in an existing wall you will need a way to make the hole in the drywall. They sell handles that accept a hacksaw blade that work very well. You will also need wire strippers and various screw drivers.

You need a duplex receptacle. Make it a 15 amp duplex receptacle. I recommend against the bulk cheap ones. Commercial grade are more expensive, but are better quality.

You need a cover plate for the receptacle. The style will depend on the box used.

Remember that electricity can and does kill people. You can kill yourself just by taking the cover off the main panel, if you make a mistake. I suggest that all work in the main panel be done with the main breaker turned OFF, and with your non-dominant hand tied behind your back. If you use two hands and get 120 or 240 volts between them, you will likely kill yourself.

Plan the entire job first, before making any holes or running any cables. Start early so you are not ruished for time and so you have daylight available, and so that you can go back to the store to get the items you forgot.
 
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Old 01-28-08, 08:16 AM
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You have several options.

If you want to maintain a dedicated circuit then you can install tandem breaker, if your panel will accept them and has room for them,or you can install a sub panel.

If you want to put this on an existing circuit (not recommended) then you can double up at the panel. This means two wires tot he same breaker directly (if allowed) or via a wire nut and pigtail. This is only legal if the circuit can be extended. Kitchen counter top circuits, bathroom receptacle circuits, and laundry circuits, for example, cannot.
 
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