Voltage

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Old 01-29-08, 08:59 AM
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Cool Voltage

Hi,
We have a home that was built in 1882, and was generally updated in the 1940s. We just had an update to the electrical to make sure we were up to code, but they did not suggest we add more wattage. Is that something that can be done? It seems something as small as the microwave pulls too much energy. What should we ask to be done?
Thanks,
Ginger
 
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Old 01-29-08, 09:12 AM
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You need to explain what you mean.

Your house has a certain service size. This will be identified (usually) by the number on your main circuit breaker. If you have fuses the service size may not be readily identifiable.

Why do you think your service size is less than you need?
 
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Old 01-29-08, 10:09 AM
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Voltage

I am not sure, and am not by the house right now to get the info. Guess I should wait. I'm in Virginia, the house is in Texas.

Our renters said the microwave took almost twice as long as they were used to to work, then also they had to flip the circuit breaker too many times, so I was just assuming we didn't have enough voltage/wattage. I don't even know the terminology - sorry.
 
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Old 01-29-08, 10:39 AM
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I suggest that you get a competent electrician to evaluate the problem. You have more wrong than you can safely handle from half the country away.
 
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Old 01-29-08, 10:50 AM
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You're right...thanks!
 
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Old 01-29-08, 12:22 PM
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Originally Posted by G1ngerbread View Post
then also they had to flip the circuit breaker too many times, so I was just assuming we didn't have enough voltage/wattage.
Circuit breakers should never (or very rarely) trip under normal usage. This means that either your power supply to the kitchen is inadequate or that the occupants of the house are using more than they should be at once. For example, even a house wired to meet the latest 2008 code will have the breaker trip if someone runs a microwave, toaster and coffee pot all on the same circuit. However, it's possible in an old house that the living room, kitchen and several other rooms may be on the same circuit making it impractical to limit the number of appliances on the circuit.

In either case, an electrician should be able to evaluate the problem and install new circuit(s) to accommodate the needs. Usually installation of a new circuit or two is a straightforward job.
 
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