how to ground plugs

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Old 02-01-08, 03:10 PM
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how to ground plugs

I want to change out my 2 prong plugs to 3 prong but the old romex has no ground wire. What are my options?
 
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Old 02-01-08, 03:28 PM
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No perfect option. What you can do is replace the receptacle with a GFCI model, making sure to attach the included label which notes that it is ungrounded.

This allows you to easily plug in 3-prong things like a microwave or whatever, and it does give you the GFCI safety protection to protect people from shock. It does not actually give you a ground, so it does not solve the problem that electronic equipment like computers really need the ground.
 
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Old 02-01-08, 03:47 PM
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Install the GFCI on the first receptacle in the run and allow the downstream receptacles to be attached to the "load" side of the GFCI, replacing the other receptacles with 3 prong receptacles. BUT, it is important you label them with "GFCI protected" and "Ungrounded".
 
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Old 02-01-08, 05:50 PM
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The perfect option would be to pull new romex . Some houses are easy, others are a night mare.
 
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Old 02-01-08, 08:15 PM
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The best option depends on why you want to do this. The three main possible reasons are: (1) to improve personal safety, (2) to protect sensitive electronic equipment, or (3) simply to be able to plug in 3-prong plugs. What's your reason?
 
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Old 02-01-08, 10:09 PM
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improve personel saftey
 
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Old 02-02-08, 05:01 PM
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Then simply replace your receptacles with GFCI receptacles. Depending on where they are and how many you have to do, you do not necessarily need to replace them all (one GFCI in the right place and wired correctly can protect multiple outlets), or it may be that a GFCI breaker would be more cost effective.
 
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