Moving main panel

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Old 02-03-08, 12:19 AM
S
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Moving main panel

Folks - been a lurker here for a while and have learned a TON. I'm an advanced DIY'er and am in the midst of a large remodel. Six panels, 100+ home runs for lighting, will probably be at close to 100 circuits by the time the project is done. In fact the only original wiring left is the main panel. That's where my question is.

Currently the panel is too high (7' 6" to the main breaker) and the thing is riddled with holes. While it could be salvaged, I'm going to replace it with a QO panel to match the rest. The current setup from the head, down to the meter socket, and through the poured concrete foundation (out of the ground), and into the back of the panel is all rigid EMT.

When I mount the new panel at the proper height, the old hole in the foundation will end up about 12-18" above the new panel. Sticking out through the concrete will be about 3/4" of thread. My first thought was to connect an LB to this, and a LL to that which would get me into the box. LB + 45 could possibly work too. Anyhow, there isn't any way to connect the LB to the threads without removing some wall so I would have clearance to turn it on - I'd rather not do that unless necessary. My other thought was to remove the EMT back up to the meter socket and redo it in Schedule 80. Being able to glue things would make things easy. Can I do that as long as I ground the meter socket to the panel? My last thought was to get a largeish junction box (6x12" - 12x12" or something like that), pop a hole in the back, lock it on similar to the existing panel, and then connect it with a straight coupling to the new panel. This seems like a reasonable way to go other than it being more expensive. What I could really use is a metal LB with a knockout that could slip over threads and be tightened down with a locknut from the inside. Is there such a thing? My last option would be to drill a new hole in the foundation and extend the EMT on the outside so that the wire would run into the back of the box. I've dealt with the foundation already on another punch through and the thing is a bear. I ran into some car parts that were part of the pour on an earlier project - I REALLY want to avoid this if possible.

My other question is regarding the power company. They'll disconnect of course, but would you expect them to do anything else on their end as it is already 200 amp service and the meter is at a reasonable height off the ground? I guess what I'm getting at is that if I start changing anything outside the house, might I suddenly find myself being asked to change out the meter socket and the mast? I really don't want to go there!

Last thought - the 6' 6" rule for the height of the breakers - is that all breakers? Just the main shutoff? If it were just the main, I could mount it so the wiring goes into the new box, main on the bottom, breakers above that, but I think I would end up with some breakers higher than 6' 6".

All thoughts appreciated!
 
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Old 02-03-08, 03:58 AM
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How about a threadless connector that threads into the LB but clamps down on the existing threads.
All breakers have to be within reach.
They might make you replace all of it anyway depending on your inspector
 
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Old 02-03-08, 07:57 AM
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plz do not use threadless conn. on threaded endsit violates code unless listed for that purpose.
Originally Posted by bmcguane View Post
How about a threadless connector that threads into the LB but clamps down on the existing threads.
All breakers have to be within reach.
They might make you replace all of it anyway depending on your inspector
 
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Old 02-03-08, 08:28 AM
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Unscrew the too short conduit and install a longer one.
 
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Old 02-03-08, 09:55 AM
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Originally Posted by joed View Post
Unscrew the too short conduit and install a longer one.
I'm sorry, I might not have explained well enough or I'm not understanding you. The conduit isn't too short - I could screw onto it, but there isn't enough clearance on the side (up against a stud/sheetrocked wall) to spin on the LB. Currently the conduit comes right into the back of the panel through a knockout and has a locknut/bushing. I'm starting to think that a 6" x 6" x 12" covered trough with a straight chunk of EMT might be the way to go - kind of a home-made LB. As long as I use the correct fittings/bushings should this be okay?
 
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Old 02-03-08, 01:33 PM
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Cut off the threads, install threadless connector
 
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