Basement receptacle Height

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Old 02-04-08, 06:26 AM
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Basement receptacle Height

Hey guys,

Im adding some receptacles in the basement and was wondering what the minimum height should be on them. Also, should the first one in line be a GFCI? There are no existing receptacles other than for the washing machine. Thanks
 
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Old 02-04-08, 06:57 AM
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Is this an unfinished basement? Do you plan on finishing it later?
 
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Old 02-04-08, 07:02 AM
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finishing this part of it. TV room. The rest will stay unfinished
 
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Old 02-04-08, 05:41 PM
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The portion that is finished does not require GFI protected receptacles, but requires you follow outlet spacing rules (within 6' of doorways and 12' or less between receptacles).

Receptacles in the unfinished portion of the basement require GFI protection.

Height is up to you. Standard height for a finished space is about 14-16", but you may want to follow the rest of your house. For the unfinished space, it's up to you.
 
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Old 02-04-08, 06:26 PM
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Ok thanks for the help.

Do you know what the reasoning is behind NOT requiring GFCI protection in the finished area? Just curious
 
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Old 02-04-08, 08:14 PM
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But becarefull i just want to head up with finshed room in basement it will have to be AFCI protected if your state do adopted the 08 code cycle. [ the GFCI will expand as well so everything have to be either AFCI or GFCI depending on what circuit it run. and oh yeah any loophole related to GFCI's they [ NEC ] snipped that out ]

Merci, Marc
 
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Old 02-05-08, 10:14 AM
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Do you know what the reasoning is behind NOT requiring GFCI protection in the finished area? Just curious
In finished areas, you're likely using TVs, lamps, etc. - things that don't have a tendency to cut through live wires or fall into puddles like drills, saws, etc. that would be used in a garage or unfinished basement.

Also finished spaces usually have floor coverings of materials with electrically insulating materials (carpet, hardwood, etc), thus reducing the potential of a deadly shock. As an example, a kid putting a paperclip in a receptacle gets a shock, but generally isn't deadly (most of us here probably did that as a kid). But do the same thing standing in a puddle of water and it may turn out differently. A cement floor is a surprisingly good ground.
 
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