Installing outlets for multiple computers

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Old 02-09-08, 07:34 AM
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Installing outlets for multiple computers

Hi,

New to this thread. Hopefully, I can get some help for my question. I have 3 computers, monitors, printers etc. that I use right now and I use multiple outlets with multiple surge strips with a huge number of extension cords. I want to install a box that allows me to use multiple outlets in this box and run them all from one breaker. I have seen these boxes in Home Depot they run from six outlets to more. I currently have a 15 amp breaker open, but I don't know if it is the correct size. How do I find out how to size this correctly?

Thanks,

Colin
 
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Old 02-09-08, 10:30 AM
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Your best bet is to use a few (as minimal as possible) power strips/surge protectors. You'd probably be better off using 2 or 3 commercially available, UL listed power strips versus building a home made power strip with 20 receptacles.

If you have a number of "wall-wart" power supplies, something like this power squid could help
http://www.thinkgeek.com/gadgets/travelpower/77e6/

Not sure about your 15A breaker question though... what exactly are you trying to do?
 
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Old 02-09-08, 12:02 PM
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Originally Posted by tttinvest View Post

[1] I have 3 computers, monitors, printers etc. that I use right now

[2] I want to install a box that allows me to use multiple outlets in this box and run them all from one breaker.

[3] I currently have a 15 amp breaker open, but I don't know if it is the correct size.

[4] How do I find out how to size this correctly?
1. Depends on the power consumption ratings on your computer & monitor nameplates, wall warts, and so on. You have to add those up and convert to amps. Also you can get a killawatt meter or an amp clamp that will measure actual consumption, which is often a bit lower that the rated consumption.

2. Are you talking about a wiremold-type strip? Is this something that wires directly to the branch circuit or does it have a plug-in connection?

3. Do you mean there is a 15A breaker in your load center that currently has no hot wire connected to it, or just that the breaker feeding the room with the computers is 15A? If it's 15A with a wire connected, you cannot just upsize to the 20A unless you have 12 AWG wire all the way. If nothing is connected and you're talking about a new circuit, I would remove the 15A breaker, put in a 20A, and go from there.

4. See (1) above. A 20A circuit is always my preference, and make sure you have a good ground. I don't think isolated ground is necessary in a residence but a continuous copper ground is preferable to relying on a raceway/conduit for grounding.
 
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