Wiring new breakers in circuit panel

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Old 02-09-08, 11:21 AM
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Wiring new breakers in circuit panel

I am installing some new breakers in my circuit panel. When wiring breakers in the circuit panel, does it matter if the neutral and ground are wired into the same hole, or do they have to be in seperate spots on the neutral buss? I have some previously wired breakers, that have the neutral, and ground twisted together, and in the same screw hold down hole on the neutral buss. Is this okay?? ................Thanks
 
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Old 02-09-08, 11:47 AM
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According to physics,.......No it doesnt matter.

If, by chance we bring code legalities into the mix....Then YES..it matters.

the simplest solution..... Ensure the neutral buss is bonded to the casing of the panel( Assuming this is a Main svc PAnel and not a sub),and add a ground buss kit. Terminate the grounds at the new buss and use 1 wire in each hole for the existing neutral buss.
 
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Old 02-09-08, 12:06 PM
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yes this is the main service panel, and not a sub. If you mean by bonding, I have a 200 amp service, 2 neutral buss on each side of main buss, a bonding plate going from one neutral buss to the other, the main ground is going to the one neutral buss, and there is a grounding screw, screwed into the panel itself,,,,,,I think this is what you mean by bonded.........as far as the ground buss kit,,,,,,should it be tied into exsisting neutral buss, or just tied into main ground with a lug clamp?
 
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Old 02-09-08, 12:11 PM
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Depending on your panel, there will be threaded holes in the casing of the panel... You will be adding a completely new BUSSBAR, using these threaded holes. If you wish to "JUMPER" the new bar to neutral, you may, but it isnt necessary , as the case should be already grounded based upon "BONDING".

Make and Model of the panel.....??????
 
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Old 02-09-08, 12:17 PM
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Iwill check ,,,,,,,,,,also,,,when adding breakers,,,,,,I have made sure that they are the same,,,,,,,I have a Cutler Hammer panel, which has the br breakers in it, so I have used the same. If I add some tandem breakers, and they are the same make, br series, it shoudn't matter right? Should I try and avoid tandem breakers?
 
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Old 02-09-08, 12:32 PM
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You must ensure that Tandems are acceptable to be installed in your panel. They will be listed on the panel label, if they are.

If indeed they are , you may use them. Just as an opinion, I wouldnt unless absolutely necessary.
 
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Old 02-10-08, 05:58 PM
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Originally Posted by Unclediezel View Post
According to physics,.......No it doesnt matter.

If, by chance we bring code legalities into the mix....Then YES..it matters.
Where does code say that the grounded and grounding conductors have to be on the different bars in the main panel?
 
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Old 02-10-08, 06:04 PM
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Where does code say that the grounded and grounding conductors have to be on the different bars in the main panel?
It doesnt...

You can have them on the same bar, but neutrals are supposed to use their own "HOLE". "One wire per screw"
 
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Old 02-10-08, 06:58 PM
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Actually, it matters according to physics too. Physics defines how things heat up and expand when electrical current runs through them, and this is the basis for the rules.
 
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