Laundry Room and Breaker Panel.

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  #1  
Old 04-03-08, 12:41 AM
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Laundry Room and Breaker Panel.

After reading thru the NEC2005 , something just came to mind while looking at Exhibit 100.7 page 16 of the 2005NEC 10th Edition (Picture of washer next to Panelboard)

I had re-routed all my plumbing from the kitchen to the Garage (underground) to make it a laundry room. The Room is now 8' by 10'. I have the Breaker Panel centered on the 8' wall with a counter on the left 10' wall and washer and dryer on the right 10' wall. I have the minimum 3' work area clearance needed for the Breaker Panel, but am worried now if code allows a washer next to a breaker panel or even in the same room .

My new 200amp Breaker Panel has not been installed yet. If I have to I can re-run all my electrical. It's just my Service Entrance is on the same wall.

Well, a couple of hours of reading and all I can find is 312.2

(A) Damp and Wet Locations In damp or wet locations, surface-type enclosures within the scope of this article shall be placed or equipped so as to prevent moisture or water from entering and accumulating within the cabinet or cutout box, and shall be mounted so there is at least 6-mm (1⁄4-in.) airspace between the enclosure and the wall or other supporting surface. Enclosures installed in wet locations shall be weatherproof. For enclosures in wet locations, ways or cables entering above the level of un-insulated live parts shall use fittings listed for wet locations.

I would not think it would be a Wet Location.
 

Last edited by mlass; 04-03-08 at 03:14 AM. Reason: Research NEC some more.
  #2  
Old 04-03-08, 06:34 AM
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I think you will be fine. The 3 foot width you have is more than the required 30 inches.

As long as no foreign systems impinge on a refrigerator sized box placed in front of the panel you should be good.

I would not consider a laundry room to be a damp location.

Are you mounting the panel between the studs or on the surface?
 
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Old 04-03-08, 09:42 AM
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The laundry area is not considered a damp location. The panel location is okay.
 
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Old 04-03-08, 11:49 AM
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That is good to know. Thanks for the response.

The more I read the book, the more question I end up with. To much information is related to Commercial and way to many pages. I need to look into a Residential one and maybe move up to 2008.
 
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Old 04-03-08, 11:57 AM
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You will be fine in the Landury room but just keep in your mind just keep the area front of the breaker box open as pcboss expaining with the space front of breaker box.

and landury room is not a damp rated room.

however keep your mind about the landury room circuit keep the light seprated from the landury room receptales [ you will end up need a GFCI if the sink is there ]

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 04-03-08, 12:25 PM
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GFCI already installed. I went the Idea that the washing machine contains water, therefore needed a GFCI. Did the same for the Dishwasher. I don't have a Garbage Disposal for now, so I don't know if that will be an issue with the GFCI.

As for my lighting, I think I will put all rooms on there own circuit (will make much easier for later lighting improvement).
 
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Old 04-03-08, 12:41 PM
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for cloth washer that fine you did add the GFCI there.


for dishwasher most place i did see and installed most useally dont use the GFCI unless the local code reqired it ditto with garbage dispoal unit. [ normally with most dishwasher we do use the garbage dispoal on the same circuit unless you got one of " supercharged " garbage dispoal motor or top of line dishwasher. then run separted circuit { usesally with 12-3 NM W/G will do it }]

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 04-03-08, 09:32 PM
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That's good to know. I had purchased 125ft and 50ft of 12/3 by mistake for the Cooktop and ended having to replacing it with 8/3. At least now you gave me an idea to use it to split the dishwasher and garbage disposal. Can I do the same with the 2 SABC in the Kitchen? I do know I'll need to use a double breaker (learned that from reading other post "Common Ground")
 
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Old 04-04-08, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by mlass View Post
Can I do the same with the 2 SABC in the Kitchen?
You can from the panel up to the first receptacle, then it needs to split into two 12/2 cables as if it was separate circuits. The reason for this is that GFCI receptacles cannot protect a downstream shared neutral.

The other option is to stick with 12/3 for the entirety of both SABC and use a 2-pole 20A GFCI breaker, but that breaker is usually over $100.
 
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Old 04-04-08, 11:33 AM
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I do go either route but i rather go with the first one as Ibpooks suggest but it can be done in either way.

it much easier to have local GFCI at the recpectale than try to run all the way back to the breaker box to reset it.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 04-04-08, 03:16 PM
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So neither the GD or DW is required to be GFI protected?
 
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Old 04-04-08, 03:18 PM
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useally no unless the manufacter or local code required it.

Merci,Marc
 
 

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