Help wiring bathroom on it's own circuit


  #1  
Old 04-08-08, 03:48 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Western Ky.
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Help wiring bathroom on it's own circuit

I live in an older home and of course have some circuits with too much on them. A couple of years ago I had my fuse box updated to a breaker box and some of the wiring was replaced at the time. I'm still replacing some on my own while renovating in my spare time. I was looking for some help in rewiring my bathroom on its own circuit. On this circuit I will have 2 light fixtures (one is a light/fan combo) controlled by 2 seperate switches, 2 single receptacles, one double receptacle and a light fixture controlled by a single switch in my pantry right next to the bathroom. First of all, is all this okay to put on a 20amp circuit? I was looking for the best way to wire all of this from the new circuit in the breaker box. I want to change it up from the way it is now. I would like all the receptacles to be hot, the double receptacle I have now is only hot when the power is switched on to the light fixture. I was really hoping to get a detailed description or diagram showing me where to run the wiring and what all the hookups would be (color to color or terminal) and where to place junction boxes if needed. I can do the manual labor it's just figuring out what to run where that's confusing to me when you get multiple items on a run. I hope that someone here can help me make my house a little safer! Thanks!
 
  #2  
Old 04-08-08, 04:02 PM
J
Member
Join Date: Sep 2002
Location: welland ontario
Posts: 7,912
Received 326 Votes on 281 Posts
The pantry light fixture can't be on the circuit. Only devices inside the bathroom can be on the circuit.
There are two basic rules for bathroom circuits. There must be a 20 amp circuit for the receptacles. That circuit can serve more than one bathroom but it must be receptacles only.
OR
The 20 amp circuit can serve lights, fans etc BUT it can't serve anything outside the bathroom.
 
  #3  
Old 04-08-08, 04:04 PM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,254
Received 114 Votes on 99 Posts
There are 2 Code compliant ways to wire bathrooms.
1) A 20 amp circuit can feed ONLY the receptacles in the bathroom or bathrooms.

2) A 20 amp circuit can feed only 1 bathroom, but the lights and receptacles can share the circuit. Other areas outside the bathroom CANNOT be on this circuit.

For clarification, when you say single outlets are you talking about a standard receptacle in a house or one that will only accept 1 plug?

Your vanity will need a receptacle within 36" of the edge of the bowl.

Once you calirify better your answer can be more tailored to your needs.
 
  #4  
Old 04-08-08, 04:23 PM
J
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2007
Location: Western Ky.
Posts: 10
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Okay, so the pantry light is out.

Yes, the single receptacle is referring to a standard receptacle and my double receptacle means two standard receptacles together and these are the ones within 36" of the vanity.

So, if everything in the bathroom can be put on the same circuit what is the best way to wire all of this from the breaker box. Electrical is really not my forte, but I'm eager to learn. I really need the electrical for dummies version of how all this is to be mapped out and what is to be hooked up where. Thanks! Hope you guys can help me out!
 
  #5  
Old 04-08-08, 04:31 PM
W
Member
Join Date: Feb 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 6,788
Received 34 Votes on 31 Posts
Bath Wiring

Make the home run a 12/2 from the panel to the light switch box. From the light switch box pull a 12/2 to the receptacles and a 12/3 to the fan light combination.

Connect all the whites together in the switch box. Connect the (2) 12/2 blacks and 2 pigtails together. Connect one pigtail to each switch. Connect the black 12/3 to one switch. Connect the red 12/3 to the other switch.
 
  #6  
Old 04-08-08, 09:06 PM
S
Member
Join Date: Nov 2007
Location: (near) Boise, ID
Posts: 441
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by jrs77 View Post
Electrical is really not my forte, but I'm eager to learn.
I suggest you buy or borrow a few electrical books.

Start with a general purpose home improvement book with color pictures. I would also buy "Wiring Simplified" which is available at big-box stores for $10 or so. Read it and keep it for reference.

I would also read through the threads on this site. Take the advice with a grain of salt; but reading the responses from the experts (not me) will give you a "real world" solution, and will make you aware of important, common sense ideas that may not be obvious in the text of a book.

You don't want to "complete" a project, then later, realize you did it improperly. Electrical can and does kill, and a mishap will not be something that you will “laugh about later” (unlike the plumbing incident where you get soaked--now that‘s funny). (copying from Unclediezel here)
 
  #7  
Old 04-08-08, 09:29 PM
Unclediezel's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: Northeastern PA.
Posts: 2,230
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As ridiculous as most of the electrical codes seem, They were written for a reason.

Think of the guy with the electric Razor, Who doesnt have a receptacle within 36 inches of the bowl......An extension cord draped across the sink?

Just as an Example, I preferred to separate lights and recepts in the Bathroom. Reason.....Bathroom Recepts are required to be GFCI protected. Trip a GFCI, and you will be fumbling around in the dark trying to find a reset button. Silly enough, but it happens. Obviously ,You cant avoid every possible dilemma, but common sense and code compliance will keep you in the BALLPARK.

The Mentioned book "Wiring Simplified" incorporates the commonly used and applied codes into the theory. The codes were written with safety in mind. As Strategery mentioned, Plumbing Screw-ups, are usually settled by drying off and trying again, then kickin back with the boys and having a few beers, and a laugh or two. Electricity doesnt give you that luxury.
 
  #8  
Old 04-09-08, 05:27 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,254
Received 114 Votes on 99 Posts
Originally Posted by Wirepuller38 View Post
Make the home run a 12/2 from the panel to the light switch box. From the light switch box pull a 12/2 to the receptacles and a 12/3 to the fan light combination.

Connect all the whites together in the switch box. Connect the (2) 12/2 blacks and 2 pigtails together. Connect one pigtail to each switch. Connect the black 12/3 to one switch. Connect the red 12/3 to the other switch.
I will expand on the above.
All the grounds need to be connected together and also to each switch or receptacle.

The first receptacle in the string should be the GFI wired into the LINE terminals. The wiring to the other downstream receptacles would connect to the LOAD terminals.

Use a proper connector for your cable at the vent fan.

Push-in connections cannot be used for 12 gauge wire so you will need to use the screw terminals.

If wired into the switch before the GFI, if the GFI trips you will not be in the dark.
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: