Emergency Lighting

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Old 04-14-08, 07:09 AM
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Emergency Lighting

The village changed the code and now requires emergency lighting in the hallway of my 2.5 story 6unit apartment building. The few lighting units I saw basically power on when a brownout is detected which means they have to connected to a constant AC source. I have plenty of hallway lights I can tap off of, but these are on a timer so they are not powered on all the time, just at night.

Do they sell emergency lighting systems that turn on via a light sensor? This way, I can run power to them via the light fixture to charge the battery but they come on in the absence of light instead in the absence of AC power. Any other ideas are appreciated! I just rather not have to run conduit all over the place to tap off a constant AC source if I don't have to.
 
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Old 04-14-08, 09:20 AM
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No, this won't meet the emergency lighting requirement. They have to be on constant AC and will turn on if the AC drops out. If all you have nearby is a switched circuit, you'll have to start pulling wire.

Even if you did find a photocell controlled light, or could jig up a light to work as such, I can practically guarantee that it won't pass the inspection.
 
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Old 04-14-08, 10:25 AM
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Another approach might be to get rid of the switch, run the emergency lights off the existing wiring, and add photo cells at the main lights. Another idea would be to use X10 controllers at the lights instead of photocells, which would allow you lots of options (e.g., the tenants could have a button to override and turn on the lights, but you could have a timer turn them back off after a few minutes).

-- Rich
 
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Old 04-14-08, 10:37 AM
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Thanks for the input!! The timer for the hallway lights is in the boiler. I can eaily get rid of the timer or flip it to ON all the time

Would that mean I have to install 11 photosensors, one for each hallway light?
 
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Old 04-14-08, 10:45 AM
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Are there no receptacles in the hallway on the building service meter? If so you could use surface race to mount the lights at appropriate height above the receptacle.

If the apartments aren't on individual meters even easier. Simply run from an apartment receptacle on the hall wall.
 
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Old 04-14-08, 10:56 AM
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Before you get too far with this what type of hallway luminaire you got there now ??

some of the code will show up in the NEC but however it will useally trumps by IBC [ International Building Code ] or per Fire code or inspector spec'ed in that area.

there are few most common emergecy luminaires that it will meet most codes

1] exit light luminaire with battery back up

2] frog eyes or bugeyes basically it is a emergecy back up luminaire with two floodlight with battery incluided

3] flourscent luminaire with battery backup included [ this part i rather defered to the electrician due the connection can get tricky on this one ]




this one type of " frog eye or Bugeye " luminaire and there are few diffrent style are avabile

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 04-14-08, 11:53 AM
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there are some that are not quite so "bug eyed". Here is a link to one that is less than $20.
http://www.emergencylighting.com/Pro...PRIZMA-685.cfm

the thing is, you need to know what you need.

How long a light stays on is critical. Most places in the country require 90 minutes and most e-lights do provide that.

There are also levels of illumination that are required as well. You local inspector would be the best place for that info since he is the one that has to approve it.
 
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Old 04-14-08, 12:08 PM
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Right now, I just have energy saver light bulbs (13 watt) on a cheap fixtures mounted in the ceilings ofthe hallways. All of these are wired through one timer. I think most of these emergency backup fixtures require constant 120v AC?
 
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Old 04-14-08, 03:19 PM
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Originally Posted by George2002 View Post
Right now, I just have energy saver light bulbs (13 watt) on a cheap fixtures mounted in the ceilings ofthe hallways. All of these are wired through one timer. I think most of these emergency backup fixtures require constant 120v AC?

yes unswitched side it have to stay hot all the time but however there are some luminaire do have switched verison so you have one line is hot all the time and second wire for switch useage to turn it on or off until the power failure show up it will bypass it. it will light automatically no matter if switch or timer is either on or off postion.

if you have conduit in your building this can be done simuiar to the same idea add a new NM as well [ if your code do allow that ]
 
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Old 04-14-08, 03:20 PM
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yes, emergency fixtures must be wired to full time hot. That is how they know the power went out and they turn on.

Now think about this with the light sensor thing. At night, when it is dark and you turn off the lighting in the hall, what do you think is going to happen with a light on a photocell?

Right, it's going to turn on.

You simply need to do this with a full time hot to some fixture that has a battery back-up and the ability to sense for presence of voltage. That means an actual emergency fixture. Cobbled together stuff generally will not be accepted because of fire codes and their specific requirements.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 10:17 PM
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emergency lighting with hall lights on a timer

There are screw in light sensors. Wire the timer out so that all light bulb sockets have 120 volts constant. Screw bulbs into the screw in light sensors. Wire into the light sockets boxes the 120 volts for the code mandated emergency light fixtures. There are approved emergency light fixtures containing the 90 minute light requirement available for about 25 dollars.
 
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Old 05-08-14, 10:23 PM
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Welcome to the forums.

Thanks for the additional info but I'd imagine they had a permanent fix long ago as this thread is over six years old.
 
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