220V Outlet For European Appliances

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-21-08, 01:43 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 80
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
220V Outlet For European Appliances

My son has lived in Germany for several years, and they have accumulated a lot of 220V kitchen appliances and power tools. Not sure what the actual voltage is. They may be moving back to the U.S. soon and are wondering what they would need in the way of wiring to use their German appliances, etc. here. I am assuming something like adding a 20-amp 220V receptacle in the kitchen, and one in the garage should be all they need. Is there a particular style of 220V receptacle for this kind of use? Of course they would have to change all the plugs to match the U.S. sockets. It seems like there is a different one for every application. Is there anything in the U.S. code that would prevent putting a 220V socket in the kitchen, along with the usual 110V sockets? Where I live, my voltage reads around 122VAC most of the time. That would put the 220V outlet at 244VAC if he were to live near here.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-21-08, 02:05 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Feb 2005
Location: Near Lansing, Michigan
Posts: 10,944
Received 42 Votes on 40 Posts
With European appliances, the problem is not the voltage. The European system uses 230V and the American system can supply 240V the difference is small enough to not be an issue. There can be a problem with the frequency difference for anything that uses a motor. The motors are designed to run on the 50Hz Euro system spin too fast on the American 60Hz system. It is not always a problem, but it can be an issue with certain appliances not functioning correctly or having premature failure.

You could install 20A 240V (NEMA 6-20R) receptacles in the kitchen area and replace the Euro plugs on the appliance cords with American (NEMA 6-20P or 6-15P) plugs. I would suggest if you choose to do this that you install a multi-wire 20A circuit with 12/3g cable and a GFCI breaker for the 240V receptacles so that the 240V receptacles could easily be converted back to 120V in the future when the Euro appliances need to be replaced with American versions.
 
  #3  
Old 04-21-08, 04:21 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Dec 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 80
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks. I will pass your note on to him.
 
  #4  
Old 04-22-08, 12:57 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
just add a quick tibbit with european cord colours


brown = hot
bleu = netural
green with yellow stripes = ground

to change over to the NA [ North America ] system you will have to change the cord connection to proper one the north american system the 240 v plugs will have no silver screw just two brass colours and green screw that it.

just a head up in case you run into like that.

Ibpooks pretty much got it there.

[ i used to live in France so i know the system pretty well ]

Merci,Marc
 
  #5  
Old 04-22-08, 01:28 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 293
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
As you will see, the German plugs are symetrical, and the use of Neutral and live conductor ar not critical. (as in your 2 pin plugs)
The moast common fuse size is 10 Amp. (Witch approx = your 10 Amp 120 V circuits regarding max wattage)
(16 amps may be used on regular outlets, but no more)

Moast equipment may work perfect at your 60 hz system, but but clocks and oldfashioned tape recorders etc. may speed up 20%.

Ranges and owens may be wired for 400V or 3 phase, (usually not)

The equipment shall be maked and if you want, take a picture of the plugs, or labels and ask.

dsk
 
  #6  
Old 04-22-08, 09:38 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Just wondering about appliances such as refrigerators that might contain lights. Are the bulbs Edison based or bayonet or something else. It was once mentioned in the forum using lights on a system with out a neutral such as US 240 could have a slight danger when changing bulbs because of a live shell.
 
  #7  
Old 04-22-08, 10:34 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 293
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Just wondering about appliances such as refrigerators that might contain lights. Are the bulbs Edison based or bayonet or something else. It was once mentioned in the forum using lights on a system with out a neutral such as US 240 could have a slight danger when changing bulbs because of a live shell.
Moast common is the E14 (small edison base) the threaded part of the base is normaly plastic, and it covers all the metal on the bulb.
The bottom part contains two brass springs, one in center, and one kinda fork shaped who makes a reliable contavt for the low watt bulbs.

Af course you should not put your fingers in there, but else, it is safe. The bulb is of course 230V as everything else in the unit.

I feel safe with it, and so do milions of europeans. In addition you have been considered this, so you will probably be safer than moast other people.

dsk
 
  #8  
Old 04-22-08, 11:42 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
That was me not the original poster asking but thanks for the info. Certainly sounds safer then ours.

(Most dangerous foreign electrical item I ever saw was in Singapore. Yardbirds working on the ship brought their own temp power panel. Panel is a geneous term. Just a flat board, no sides, no cover. There were pegs for fuse wire and they hung this on a rail only a few feet above a bilge of salt water. Dang scary just walking by it.)
 
  #9  
Old 05-03-08, 11:18 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 293
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I dont know ifthis tells anything about the lamp socket:

One spring hits the center, and one hits the threaded part of the lamp.

On the other hand US and European Edison threads has a slghtly different diameter.
I've never noticed any difference in real use.


dsk
 
  #10  
Old 05-03-08, 02:15 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: Milwaukee WI
Posts: 1,338
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
With European appliances, the problem is not the voltage. The European system uses 230V and the American system can supply 240V the difference is small enough to not be an issue.
I recall a discussion a while back where somebody brought up that there is a problem because the European system is 230V to ground, while the North American system is 120V to ground and 240V leg-to-leg.

In other words, is it OK to hook up two hots to the european appliances that were designed for a 230V hot and a neutral?
 
  #11  
Old 05-03-08, 07:49 PM
Member
Join Date: Apr 2004
Location: Ontario Canada
Posts: 1,767
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Most appliances are deisgned to not matter, as most european outlets are not polarised
 
  #12  
Old 05-03-08, 10:37 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
ArgMeMatey.,,


Useally most appalices in European area are not much issue with North Americian system [ 240 v ] some are double inslulated so it may not affect not too much at all

but only thing it will affect is the motors like fan[s] or clock motor etc it will run little more faster than normal but for heating element it dont make a differnce there.

Merci,Marc
 
  #13  
Old 05-04-08, 12:33 AM
1Geniere's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Dec 2003
Posts: 113
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
[QUOTE=ArgMeMatey;1359835]...that there is a problem because the European system is 230V to ground, while the North American system is 120V to ground and 240V leg-to-leg...QUOTE]

While your statement is correct, it would be more properly stated if you substituted "neutral" for "ground". Electrons flow in a circuit, they don't care whether the circuit is referenced to ground or not. Ignoring overvoltage and safety considerations, it is not necessary to connect the neutral to ground, the circuit would function normally.

So whether you use the 2 "hot legs" of the North American system, or the "hot" and neutral of the European system it doesn't matter. Obviously the voltage and frequency requirements of the various appliances determine the suitability of the power source.

Steve
 
  #14  
Old 05-04-08, 02:22 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2007
Location: Norway
Posts: 293
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Older Norwegian supplies (20 years and more)
has normally a system quite equal to the US 208V system, but they did not use te grounded conductor.



All European single phase units are (or should be) buildt safe to this system too.

dsk
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: