Installing 220 V Shore Power to my dock

Reply

  #1  
Old 04-24-08, 06:02 AM
N
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Apr 2008
Location: East Coast Central Florida
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Installing 220 V Shore Power to my dock

The old electrical panel in the house is an 100 Amp service with a common neutral/ground. I need a sanity check to ensure I will be doing the right thing. I plan to install a 30 amp double pole breaker in the panel, Red/black wire to breaker and white to Neutral bus and along the way to the dock drive in to the ground a 8 foot 3/4 inch copper pipe for the bare ground wire. I will use 10/3 AWG wiring for 30 amps max. The boat's circuit calls for a 50 Amp service, but we only plan to use the battery charger and maybe the A/C occassionally. We have to install a 120/220 50 Amp receptical at the dock to get the service to the boat using the recommended boat plug. Is there anything I am missing here?? I would appreciate any comments!!!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 04-24-08, 06:26 AM
T
Member
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 1,607
Received 40 Votes on 39 Posts
I don't like it

It's not a good thing to install a 50A recept that will only deliver 30A. The next user will be dissapointed, and it's against code. Verify that you need 240 to the boat. Both 50A 125 and 125/250V plugs use three blades, so the difference is somewhat subtle.
 
  #3  
Old 04-24-08, 12:40 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 192
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by nickere View Post
The old electrical panel in the house is an 100 Amp service with a common neutral/ground. I need a sanity check to ensure I will be doing the right thing. I plan to install a 30 amp double pole breaker in the panel, Red/black wire to breaker and white to Neutral bus and along the way to the dock drive in to the ground a 8 foot 3/4 inch copper pipe for the bare ground wire. I will use 10/3 AWG wiring for 30 amps max. The boat's circuit calls for a 50 Amp service, but we only plan to use the battery charger and maybe the A/C occassionally. We have to install a 120/220 50 Amp receptical at the dock to get the service to the boat using the recommended boat plug. Is there anything I am missing here?? I would appreciate any comments!!!

Why are you driving a ground rod? I'm not quite sure what you are saying here...It is unnecessary and depending on what you mean, could be dangerous.

I also recommend running larger wire appropriate for a 50 amp breaker such as #6 Cu. I do not think it is a code violation as the cable is protected by the breaker, but it would be dangerous and a code violation if someone later down the road comes along and changes the breaker to a 50 amp breaker.

How long is the run from the panel to the outlet? Voltage drop may be an issue.
 
  #4  
Old 04-24-08, 03:13 PM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
there is pretty strict code related to the marina wiring set up and you will have a subpanel near the dock however there are some local code it will come up with this matter.

for starters .,,

you need to bring out min of #6 THHN/THWN copper to the subpanel which it will be used with 50 amp two pole breaker.

i belive if my memory serve me right with dock set up [ correct me if i am wrong on this one ] yes you need ground rods that will be tied to the grounding wire [ EGC conductor ]

you will need min of 3/4 inch PVC conduit but however if you are covering pretty long distance it will be wise to bump up to 1 inch size.

you may want to check the NEC in art 555 if i recall it right.

and you will have to get ahold of electrical inspector on this one they will have more details for your area.

Merci,Marc
 
  #5  
Old 04-24-08, 05:10 PM
D
Member
Join Date: Jul 2005
Location: Central Indiana
Posts: 192
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Hey telecom guy, you're right, it is a code violation to have different sized breaker and receptacle. NEC 555.19(A)(3)

Branch Circuits. Each single receptacle that supplies
shore power to boats shall be supplied from a marine power
outlet or panelboard by an individual branch circuit of the
voltage class and rating corresponding to the rating of the
receptacle.
As far as grounding requirements go, the code says:

555.15 Grounding. Wiring and equipment within the
scope of this article shall be grounded as specified in Article
250 and as required by 555.15(A) through (E).
(A) Equipment to Be Grounded. The following items
shall be connected to an equipment grounding conductor
run with the circuit conductors in the same raceway, cable,
or trench:
(1) Metal boxes, metal cabinets, and all other metal enclosures
(2) Metal frames of utilization equipment
(3) Grounding terminals of grounding-type receptacles
(B) Type of Equipment Grounding Conductor. The
equipment grounding conductor shall be an insulated copper
conductor with a continuous outer finish that is either
green or green with one or more yellow stripes. The equipment
grounding conductor of Type MI cable shall be permitted
to be identified at terminations. For conductors
larger than 6 AWG, or where multiconductor cables are
used, re-identification of conductors as allowed in
250.119(A)(2)(b) and (A)(2)(c) or 250.119(B)(2) and
(B)(3) shall be permitted.
(C) Size of Equipment Grounding Conductor. The insulated
copper equipment grounding conductor shall be sized
in accordance with 250.122 but not smaller than 12 AWG.
(D) Branch-Circuit Equipment Grounding Conductor.
The insulated equipment grounding conductor for branch
circuits shall terminate at a grounding terminal in a remote
panelboard or the grounding terminal in the main service
equipment.
(E) Feeder Equipment Grounding Conductors. Where a
feeder supplies a remote panelboard, an insulated equipment
grounding conductor shall extend from a grounding
terminal in the service equipment to a grounding terminal
in the remote panelboard.
Not sure if a ground rod is required or not, but definately get your electrical inspector involved early for tips and local code requirements.
 
  #6  
Old 04-25-08, 04:17 AM
R
Member
Join Date: Apr 2007
Location: Near Buffalo, NY
Posts: 4,239
Received 1 Vote on 1 Post
240 shore power is rare ...

Originally Posted by telecom guy View Post
Verify that you need 240 to the boat.
Agreed. Shore power is almost universal at 120 volts and uses a waterproof 30-amp Hubbel twist-lock connector. If you ever want to connect to a public dock, this is the standard.


Photo courtesy starboardsupply.com
 
  #7  
Old 05-15-08, 10:37 AM
M
Member
Join Date: Aug 2006
Posts: 4
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Although it is probably a good idea to refer to Article 555. IMO it does not apply in this case.

NEC 2005 555.1 Private, noncommercial docking facilities constructed or occupied for use of the owner or residents of the associated single-family dwelling are not covered by this article.
 
  #8  
Old 05-15-08, 10:40 AM
F
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by MikeVa View Post
Although it is probably a good idea to refer to Article 555. IMO it does not apply in this case.

NEC 2005 555.1 Private, noncommercial docking facilities constructed or occupied for use of the owner or residents of the associated single-family dwelling are not covered by this article.

True that correct but however IIRC there is other section that do cover it [ not sure if in 552 or 558 ]

Merci,Marc
 
Reply
Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: