GFCI on a bathroom fixture?

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Old 04-30-08, 12:14 PM
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GFCI on a bathroom fixture?

I have an apartment building with no electrical receptacles in the bathrooms. If we choose to add them in a standard code-compliant configuration, we will need to add a 20A circuit from the panel all the way to the bathroom.

I suspect that when the building was built, they had light fixtures with outlets integrated.

Is there a light fixture that would include a GFCI or any other way to avoid running the new wiring? What about replacing the existing breaker in the panel and putting in a GFCI, and getting a fixture with an outlet?

Any solution has to be code-compliant; I am just looking for a way to avoid the mess and expense of getting to the panel ... most of these are large units with vaulted ceilings so the only pretty way is by wiremold or lots of wall work.
 
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Old 04-30-08, 01:06 PM
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Is the existing circuit 20A? Does the existing circuit feed anything other than the bathroom?
 
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Old 04-30-08, 03:57 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Is the existing circuit 20A? Does the existing circuit feed anything other than the bathroom?
No and Yes. The buildings is 1960s-vintage. The general contractor has an electrician working on this, so they have explored all the easy options.

I am looking for something obscure or exceptional that is specifically designed for this purpose, and I fully realize there may be zero other options, in which case we spend a lot of money or none at all.
 
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Old 05-01-08, 09:28 AM
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I was hoping to cherry-pick an easy solution, but it looks like that's already been explored. There's nothing I know of other than installing the new 20A circuit.
 
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Old 05-01-08, 02:42 PM
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Code requires that if you upgrade, you must bring things all the way up to today's code. This means that even if you make it "better", it's not sufficient unless it is all the way up to today's code. A lot of people disagree with this requirement, but you cannot usually get around it. So yes, sometimes your only options are to spend a lot of money or none at all.
 
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