heating element

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Old 05-20-08, 03:35 PM
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Question heating element

i want to hook up electicity to a piece of metal as to create a heating element with out triping breaker or melting things down, is this possible?
 
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Old 05-20-08, 04:38 PM
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Probably not. The "metal" must have some resistance, otherwise you effectively have a dead short to ground, assuming the other end is grounded. If it is not grounded, you only have a different kind of conductor. That means tripped breakers, sparks, fire, etc.
 
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Old 05-20-08, 04:53 PM
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Welcome to our forums.

I agree that the answer is no.

In addition to having no resistance the surface of the "steel" would be live.
Exposed elements are typically a piece of resistance wire embedded in a cement type material covered by a grounded metal shield just like a surface stove element.

What are you trying to do?
 
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Old 05-21-08, 08:13 PM
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I am going to say yes, but you will need a transformer with a properly sized output voltage/current.
 
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Old 05-22-08, 04:56 AM
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A couple of light bulbs under the metal will make it quite hot.
 
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Old 05-22-08, 12:36 PM
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Originally Posted by clown View Post
i want to hook up electicity to a piece of metal as to create a heating element with out triping breaker or melting things down, is this possible?
Ya mean something like a handrail? Sidewalk grate? Door handle? Desk? Faucet? It's going to be tough to burn somebody that way unless you've got a lot of power available.

Maybe you can study this and adapt it:

http://www.appliance411.com/faq/test-element.shtml
 
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Old 05-22-08, 05:22 PM
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Well if you used a Nichrome plate for your metal maybe if it was thin enough or supply wire large enough. If you tell us what your doing maybe someone can help with a better way.
 
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Old 05-22-08, 05:46 PM
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As ray mentions, there are metals which have heating properties. In other words, you can make a coil or a strip which you can carefully control the resistance...watts.. based on length of wire, square inches of strip, etc. Nichrome is one compound. Plain iron, steel, copper, etc, you need a tremendous length to get enough resistance to control the heat and not represent a "short circuit" in any reasonable circuit
 
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Old 05-23-08, 11:16 AM
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i`m not trying to burn any one i have a ski press that i need to heat up a metal sandwich cassette to a 180 .
 
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Old 05-23-08, 12:08 PM
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You need a heat source to heat the metal plate. The light bulb suggestion is a good but perhaps impractical example. Off the top of my head, with little real knowledge, I'm thinking ceramic heating units glued to the plate.

A picture to this machine and what you need to heat might help.
 
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Old 05-23-08, 04:39 PM
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piece of cake

Originally Posted by clown View Post
i`m not trying to burn any one i have a ski press that i need to heat up a metal sandwich cassette to a 180 .
The cheap way is to get an old range element, maybe even the controls. "calrod". use a meat thermometer.

The expensive way is to google "Watlow" and buy their stuff (heating elements), machine a hole or groove, and get a temp. controller from somebody like omega with a matching thermocouple.

The exotic way is to do inductive heating, but I have no personal experience there to offer.
 
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