Help wiring 2 fluorescent lights under my carport

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Old 05-31-08, 08:39 PM
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Help wiring 2 fluorescent lights under my carport

Florida

I plan to install 2 fluorescent lights under my carport tomorrow, but i'm not sure what all has to be done. I can't seem to find an appropriate article on this on the web...though I'm sure one is there somewhere if anyone knows.

Otherwise, if anyone here cares to help me out I would greatly appreciate it.

My garage is seperate from my house and already has a circuit breaker, light switches, etc... the carport is connected to the garage and I'd like to run wires from the garage outside to my carport. If possible I'd like to tie into any existing light switch so I don't have to run a new line to the breaker.

I've limited know-how in this field, but i've done a few things here and there. but if anyone could run me through this real quick I can probably get all the details I by just reading around.

thanks
 
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Old 05-31-08, 09:26 PM
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How is the structure framed? Will there be any chance of the lights getting wet? Are you planing on using standard T-8 (or T-12) lamps or using bug (yellow) lamps?
 
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Old 05-31-08, 10:14 PM
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Something to be aware of is that many fluorescent fixtures do not like high humidity or temperatures much below fifty degrees F.
 
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Old 06-01-08, 08:11 AM
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You can get 0 degree starting, cold-weather tolerant fluorescents - these aren't going to be the $5 cheapies, but you probably don't want those anyway.

Also, you need to decide if you want hardwired or "plug-in type" lights. Plug-ins are useful if you want to be able to replace them easily, or have an outlet up on the ceiling in a pinch.

I assume there's NO wiring at ALL in the carport currently? What you can do really depends on what's available to use and how hard it is to get it out to the carport - also, this IS a "permanent" carport, right, not one of those "tent-like" metal deals that just stands up there?
 
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Old 06-01-08, 08:14 AM
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Originally Posted by Tolyn Ironhand View Post
How is the structure framed? Will there be any chance of the lights getting wet? Are you planing on using standard T-8 (or T-12) lamps or using bug (yellow) lamps?

It's wood framed with a shingled roof. I included a picture so you can see for yourself.

I'm not sure about the T-8 or T-12 lamps. I'm looking for something pretty long so it covers a good bit of the width of the carport. Maybe 4ft long would work with 2 bulbs per fixture. The bug lights would be nice, because florida has lots of them... but I want these lights so I can work on my car and I'm afraid the yellow lights might be a problem then.



I have some fluorescent lamps in my garage and the humidity and cold weather hasn't seemed to damaged them, but i'll keep that advice in mind.

thanks
 
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Old 06-01-08, 08:26 AM
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Originally Posted by TheWGP View Post
You can get 0 degree starting, cold-weather tolerant fluorescents - these aren't going to be the $5 cheapies, but you probably don't want those anyway.

Also, you need to decide if you want hardwired or "plug-in type" lights. Plug-ins are useful if you want to be able to replace them easily, or have an outlet up on the ceiling in a pinch.

I assume there's NO wiring at ALL in the carport currently? What you can do really depends on what's available to use and how hard it is to get it out to the carport - also, this IS a "permanent" carport, right, not one of those "tent-like" metal deals that just stands up there?
I'd prefer the plug in type lights, but whatever is cheaper/easier to install.

This is a permanent carport.

There is no wiring in the carport, but there is some in the garage it connects to...so it would just be a matter of drilling a hole I suppose.
 
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Old 06-01-08, 01:47 PM
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Your local electrical code will dictate what is acceptable. Most likely type UF nonmetallic cable will be fine. Use #12 if the circuit you wish to connect to is protected by a 20 ampere circuit breaker (or fuse) and #14 if protected by a 15 ampere breaker.
 
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Old 06-01-08, 08:30 PM
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You can use the standard flourscent strip luminaire under the carport roof you can have one wired with porch light and use with yellow flourscent bulb [ you may want to stop by electrical supply centre or go online and order yellow bug lite bulb verison ] and have other one or two wired with a switch you can turn on the regualr flourscent bulbs on.

BTW yes it do come in either 4 or 8 foot verison so it up to you what to do with it.

Merci,Marc


BTW i will provide the photo what yellow sleeve look like


 
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Old 06-02-08, 07:03 AM
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The picture makes things a whole lot clearer - yes, this should be relatively simple - exactly as furd said, UF #12 if it's a 20a circuit, #14 if it's a 15a.

One question - he said he'd prefer the plug-in type lights, so presumably he's going to be installing an outlet up on one of those beams. Is this a situation where it would need a weatherproof "in-use" cover, or is it protected enough not to? It needs to be GFCI-protected anyway, right?

I think Marc's idea about having both yellow "bug-light" and normal fluorescent bulbs out there is a good one for the situation, especially if you set it up so you can control them independently. If for some reason you don't want them separately switched, you could easily use fixtures that have pull-chains to turn the bug-lights off separately if you need to.
 
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Old 06-02-08, 07:26 AM
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When you say you would like to tie into the existing switch do you mean the existing switich will turn on the new lights as well or that you would install a new switch and take power from the existing one.
If the second option then you need to tell us all the wires in the existing switch box to know if that is possible.
 
 

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