GFI breaker without test button??

Reply

  #1  
Old 06-29-08, 11:50 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: US
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
GFI breaker without test button??

I was looking through the main breaker panel in my "new" house and noticed that all the "right" places (garage, kitchen, bathroom etc) are labeled with GFI on the door in the list describing each circuit. However, these breakers look the same as all the other ones, and don't have a test button (unless they're behind the front panel protecting the wires?).

So my question is, are these actually non-GFI breakers (that for some reason are labeled GFI), or are there GFI breakers without test buttons? Do I have to buy a GFI tester to find out?

Thanks!!
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 06-30-08, 12:40 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Do you have GFCI receptacles? The panel wording may only refer to the type of receptacle they serve. A GFCI breaker will have a coiled white pigtail to the neutral bar.
 
  #3  
Old 06-30-08, 12:27 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: US
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Do you have GFCI receptacles?
In some places, but I don't think they're wired to protect the rest of the receptacles. For example, there's one GFCI receptable next to the toilet, but the two non-GFCI ones above the sinks are still hot after I trip the toilet one using the test button.

Thanks, I'll check for the coiled neutral when I get a chance.
 
  #4  
Old 06-30-08, 12:47 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ray has undoubtedly identified the correct explanation. These are not GFCI breakers, but ordinary breakers on a circuit with GFCI receptacle(s).

husbus, some other GFCI probably protects the ones above the sinks.
 
  #5  
Old 06-30-08, 01:39 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,493
Received 33 Votes on 25 Posts
Or perhaps some previous owner had some appliance that was tripping the GFCI breakers and replaced them with regular breakers. If this is the case then you need to get either new GFCI breakers or else install GFCI receptacles on the "first" receptacle in these circuits.
 
  #6  
Old 06-30-08, 08:26 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: US
Posts: 51
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by furd View Post
Or perhaps some previous owner had some appliance that was tripping the GFCI breakers and replaced them with regular breakers.
Yes, this seems like the most likely explanantion at this point. The previous owner did some other "strange" things.

Thanks all!
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: