adding receptacle and switch/light

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Old 07-02-08, 10:52 PM
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adding receptacle and switch/light

Hey, newbie here.

So I've been reading posts here for a few hours, but can't find my specific situation mentioned, so I thought I'd post it and ask for some advice.

I have a circuit with 2 receptacles on it, and that's all.

So I want to add a new receptacle, as well as a switch to control a new light fixture.

The addition would take place in the middle of the run, and the outlet would not be switched to the switch. The switch would only control the light.

So I was thinking that it would go something like this:

outlet 1 (first original outlet) would lead out to new box

in box, wire would be pigtailed

I would then connect one black to the switch and the other to the receptacle.

One white would go from pigtail to receptacle.

I would drop a new wire down from the ceiling for the light fixture into the new box, and tie the white and remaining white from the pigtail together.

The wire leading out to the end of run receptacle would then attach to the new receptacle as would any other receptacle.

all grounds tied together

Does this sound like it makes sense?
 
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Old 07-03-08, 01:15 AM
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Before I can comment on this one what room this set up will be used for ??

the reason why due you mention one switch box which you will have duplex receptale and single pole switch there it will varies depending on location if that area will reqired a GFCI or not.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 07-03-08, 06:19 AM
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hey,
thanks for replying.

To answer your question: The first outlet of the two that are on the circuit already had a GFCI, so I think I'm all set there.

The new outlet wouldn't be reserved for anything specific - it's really just to have an outlet in a more convenient location in the room. The switch would go to a new pendant light.

So with 3 seldom used outlets and one light, I don't think I'm in any danger of overloading the circuit, and from what I've learned, I think the existing GFCI on the first outlet should have me covered.

what do you think?
 
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Old 07-03-08, 06:45 AM
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Depending on what this circuit serves and the room that it is in could mean that you cannot add the new light to it.

Could you please tell us which room this serves?
 
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Old 07-03-08, 08:04 AM
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The circuit currently server two outlets, one in the kitchen and another in the dining room. That is all.
 
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Old 07-03-08, 08:14 AM
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Kitchen and dining room receptacle circuits can only serve receptacles in those rooms.

No lighting is allowed on those circuits.
 
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Old 07-03-08, 08:36 AM
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I’m not sure I understand what you’re saying. Are you saying that in a kitchen you can’t mix outlets and light switches? And are you saying that dining rooms somehow have to meet different regulations? This doesn’t seem to make sense to me, but again, I could be misinterpreting what you’re saying.

The new outlet and light I’m considering would not be in a different room, but in the kitchen – not sure if this makes a difference or not.

Can you clarify or point me to the specific wording of the code so I can read up on it?
 
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Old 07-03-08, 09:09 AM
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Yes, that's exactly what we're saying. In a kitchen, you cannot mix outlets and light switches on the same circuit. The same is true for dining rooms. It doesn't make sense to a lot of people, but the rule is there nevertheless. The code just wants to make sure you don't start stealing power from the circuit designed to serve countertop appliances.

I suggest you pick up a copy of the inexpensive green paperback book Wiring Simplified. It's available in most home centers (usually on a rack in the electrical aisle). Read the section on kitchens. It explains all the codes.
 
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Old 07-03-08, 09:55 AM
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Thanks, I get it now...I just didn't understand from the way the previous posts were phrased.
 
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