Zzzzzzt.

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Old 07-09-08, 10:58 PM
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Zzzzzzt.

I recently moved into a home built in 1980 and went through the house and replaced all the receptacles and switches to the more modern style. About 2 months later, during a storm we experienced a couple power surges (the light in my master bedroom surged on even though the switch was off!) and breaker #15 goes off. I turn it back on, go upstairs and turn on one of the lights and the breaker goes off again. I repeat this two more times and now I can't get the breaker to stay on. When I try to turn it back on, I hear a zzzt and the breaker stays off.

So is this a short? Should replace breaker #15 in the box? That line has 2 plug-ins (one with a switch controlling it), 1 3way switch and light fixture, 1 switch for outside lights, and one switch for a front entrance light.

Thanks for any help on this.
JimK.
 
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Old 07-10-08, 08:25 AM
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Is the breaker an AFCI or GFCI type with a test button or just a standard breaker with a switch handle?
 
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Old 07-10-08, 08:39 AM
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Cool

If you have the know how and skill ,(no big deal really except working in the panel one must always be very mindfull, I always wear leather gloves) you can try switching your wire to another breaker of the same value, and see if that resolves the problem. If you do have an AFCI this may not be a good Idea. In other words wait for further response from the pros before attempting what "I" would do.
 
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Old 07-10-08, 10:06 AM
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Leather gloves are not going to save your life.

There are many different possible causes for your problem. It may be a safety problem, so if you cannot find the source quickly, get some help.
 
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Old 07-10-08, 03:00 PM
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There are few possiblty that cause the bolted fault {short circuit } or Arc fault { partal short circuit useally cause by surge }

But however you will have to find the short starting at the switch or receptales to find a burnted arc mark they useally leave a telltale mark somewhere either by black soot or melted wires.

If you can't find them that ok leave them out but do not disconnect the wires yet make a note of connections before you remove switches and devices and get the ohm meter and ring it out if you have a short somewhere in the line it will show up pretty fast but.,,

Myself I rather have you get ahold of electrician to come in and have the system megger it out to make sure that way with megger testing it will really show where is the bad spot and go from there.

{ If you wonding why i mention megger and yes I have megger tester which it will induce 500~1000 V DC just enough to see where the breakdown location to replace the wire. this type of test is best leave to qualifed electrician due the safety issue there}

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 07-10-08, 06:32 PM
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Exclamation

So John , If leather gloves can't save my life, can they prevent me from loosing it? How bout rubber gloves underneath the leather gloves? If the glove don't fit you can't aquit. Joking aside, never do I feel secure removing the panel cover without gloves. Are you saying they will not protect me (the leather gloves that is) should the panel cover plate be "HOT" for some unexpected reason while I'm removing it? I have found some bus burs from the meter dangerously close to to the top of the panel cover . So where can I find a pair of gloves that will protect me? The electrical houses just seem to have the standard gloves you would find at the Home Depot. Thank you for the caution.
 
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Old 07-10-08, 08:24 PM
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Sidecutter., the leather gloves may give you some protection when the gloves are dry but when it get wet forget it you have no protection at all.

Rubber gloves may protection but I just can't garrantie the safety at all if you have a very little pinhole and you work around electrical stuff and a pinhole that all it need to nail ya.

I have lineman glove that is rated good up to 24KV { 24,000 volts } normally that is reversed for hevey commercal work and I have other lineman glove that is good for 12KV and the last set i have is good for 1KV and the set{s} are not cheap.

Majorty of the resdential panel useally I don't have much issue with it but meter socket that automatic glove up spot.

However some specal commercal supply centre will have lineman glove on stock you may have to ask for the lineman glove and the voltage rating for it [ for majorty of resdentail and light commercal you can ask for 1 KV gloves ]

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 07-10-08, 09:36 PM
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Wink

Thanx Marc (vielen dank)
 
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Old 07-11-08, 08:27 AM
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I have bought a few pairs of lineman gloves online. I don't think I should post a link to a specific shop, but you can find one if you search for "lineman gloves". I use the Salisbury brand of gloves. They are rated in classes for the voltage level -- you would only need class 00 for residential voltage which should be under $100 for a kit with rubber gloves and the leather protectors. Note that these are fitted gloves, so you will have to measure your hands to get the right size.

While these gloves will protect your hands and wrists when used properly, you may find it difficult to get anything done with them in a residential panel because of the tight clearance. Lineman gloves are bulky and stiff compared to regular work gloves.

P.S.: Wear ANSI safety glasses too. I really don't want to terrify you, but people too often only think of the shock hazard. If things really go wrong in a panel, the arc blast can shoot out molten metal which you really don't want in your eyes.
 
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Old 07-11-08, 09:42 AM
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Smile

Hope I haven't "Hijacked" this thread with the glove and safety concerns!? Thanx also ibpooks fro the addditional info. I have seen linemans gloves once or twice and as I recall they are not something I would want to wear just for the purposes of pulling out a stubborn zinsco c/b (might be impossible lol). I would like another opinion (yours please, if you would) on regular (dry and unabused) leather gloves bought at the home depot with rubber gloves (without pinholes) worn under-neath. If indeed I was so armed, should I not have "supreme confidence" of my safety?
 
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Old 07-11-08, 12:35 PM
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Regular rubber gloves do not carry a voltage protection rating. I would not want to chance my life on a dishwashing glove.

Even gloves that are rated are supposed to be tested twice yearly to verify that they will still protect you from the hazards.

OSHA also has strict rules about live work. Very few conditions qualify that the work be performed hot.

Ben also spoke about the arc blast. Google this term and see if you would want to stand in front of one of these faults.

Scan these for more info.
http://www.lni.wa.gov/safety/researc...zardreport.pdf

http://www.cdc.gov/elcosh/docs/d0500...0/d000580.html

Here is a quick video with a dummy.
http://youtube.com/watch?v=4w4h7gnc3qM
 
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Old 07-11-08, 08:56 PM
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Electrical gloves also require periodic testing. There is an "air test" that is done every time before use where you trap air in the rubber glove and squeeze it to make sure there are no pinholes and then there are tests that require a glove tester that tests the gloves with a high voltage source. On my last job (prior to retirement) I was issued a set of gloves and protectors for use up to 480 volts nominal and if I remember correctly they were exchanged every quarter for newly tested gloves.

Under no circumstances are the rubber gloves to be used without the leather protectors.
 
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