GFCI Receptacle Amperage

Reply

  #1  
Old 07-13-08, 02:17 PM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
GFCI Receptacle Amperage

I need to install a Receptacle-type GFCI on my kitchen counter. There are 4 existing 15-amp receptacles on a 20-Amp circuit (20 amp circuit breaker). Do I install a 15 or a 20 Amp GFCI?
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 07-13-08, 02:24 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The standard 15A GFCI receptale are rated for 20 amp feed thru so you will have no issue with that.

But make sure you watch out the line and load connection and how many receptales downstream will be on this circuit.

If this circuit do not have any type of GFCI at all before you start that make sure you mapped out the circuit to see where it will affect any other circuits like other light or receptales.

Once you mapped out then you can able pretty much pinpoint where is the starting point to install the GFCI receptale If more than two pairs of cables in there post it back then we can see where go from there.

If you have test light that will really help you to determed which is line and load by testing the hot and netural wires with test light once you know then the rest should be pretty much on target.

Merci,Marc
 
  #3  
Old 07-13-08, 06:02 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 239
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by french277V View Post
The standard 15A GFCI receptale are rated for 20 amp feed thru so you will have no issue with that.
Marc, could you elaborate a little on that for some of us relative noobs?

What exactly does "20 amp feed thru" mean and if it's o.k. to use a 15amp GFI on a 20 amp circuit, then why bother with a 20amp GFI at all?

I've been wondering this for a little while now. Is it rated for 20amp but will trip when exceeding 15amp? Or does over-current play no factor and it still just monitors imbalace between load wires?
 
  #4  
Old 07-13-08, 07:22 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,482
Received 25 Votes on 19 Posts
Feed-through means that the incoming line can continue at the same amperage rating.

Although rarely found in household appliances the 20 ampere plug will not fit in a 15 ampere receptacle. A single (meaning only one place to plug in) receptacle on a 20 ampere circuit must be a 20 ampere type but since most receptacles are of the duplex type they have two places to plug in separate appliances with a maximum rating of 15 amperes on a single plug.

Overcurrent plays no part in GFCI circuit interruption, it is only imbalance between the hot and neutral conductors.
 
  #5  
Old 07-13-08, 08:12 PM
Banned. Rule And/Or Policy Violation
Join Date: Apr 2006
Location: Columbus, Ohio
Posts: 239
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks furd. Makes more sense now, I think. If you could humor me for one post more.

Your saying that you can put a 17amp draw on a 15amp GFCI and the outlet itself can safely handle it?

A 20amp receptacle is basically ONLY to accommodate a 20amp plug on an appliance?
 
  #6  
Old 07-13-08, 09:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Sep 2000
Location: United States
Posts: 18,497
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
why bother with a 20amp GFI at all?
You almost never need a 20-amp receptacle (GFCI or regular). Most homes have none at all.
 
  #7  
Old 07-13-08, 09:06 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: Wet side of Washington state.
Posts: 18,482
Received 25 Votes on 19 Posts
Each "plug-in position" on a 15 ampere duplex receptacle is rated for up to 15 amperes although the entire receptacle (assuming a 20 ampere "pass through" rating) is rated for a maximum of 20 amperes.

So that could mean 15 amperes in one position and 5 amperes in the second position or any other similar combination.
 
  #8  
Old 07-13-08, 11:13 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The only true 20 amp GFCI receptale useally are found in commercal location and they are genrally little more expensive than standard 15 amp GFCI receptale are.

In the resdentail useage it very rare to see a true 20 amp receptale [ GFCI or standard type ] not very many appliances that really reqired a 20 amp plug with 20 amp receptale.

But very instering tibbit in here for most reader may not know this but I know few will know this one both 15 amp and 20 amp receptales the inteal gut [ electrical concats ] are the same for both 15 and 20 amp the only differince is the face plate that it. { I did took both 15 and 20 amp receptale apart before so i know how they look like inside }


Here what the 120 v 20amp receptale look like





The only other sisuation if you have singleplex recceptale with 20 amp circuit you will have to use the true 20 amp singleplex verison what see above photo

Merci,Marc
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: