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My ceiling fan has no pull chains, ? about wall fan control

My ceiling fan has no pull chains, ? about wall fan control

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  #1  
Old 07-18-08, 11:36 AM
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My ceiling fan has no pull chains, ? about wall fan control

I picked up a high end Hampton Bay ceiling fan at HD...real stylish like, big motor, big lights (stupid intermediate sized bases).

It comes with one of those wireless remotes for idiots that don't know how to fish wire, you put the receiver in the canopy.

Well, that one went in the junk drawer, muscled the whole thing up and ready to wire the two switches. Then it hits me, this fan has no chains to select the fan speed.

What a crock of stupid. I hate those remotes that you're supposed to keep track of. So here is my question:

The remotes that you get that fit in a junction box, are they all wireless or what? And if not, will any work with whatever? I've seen the Hunter universal one, looks ok for this application, even thought I'm trying to do push button switches.

I know enough not to use a dimmer, but will any of the positional ones do?
 

Last edited by pcboss; 07-18-08 at 06:01 PM. Reason: offensive language
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Old 07-18-08, 11:55 AM
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So why not use the remote that came with the fan? It is designed to work with it. Fan speeds are controlled by switching in or out capacitors. This has to be done at the fan, either by a mechanical switch or electronic remote.
 
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Old 07-18-08, 12:48 PM
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I see a several options.

One is to afix the hand-held remote to the wall so that it cannot get lost.

A second option is to go back and buy a different fan, one that has the features you want.

A third is to buy a Hunter All-Fan wall control. It should work for your application (assuming the remote receiver that came with your fan is removeable), although it will add about $40 to your cost (perhaps making option #2 look better).
 
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Old 07-18-08, 01:26 PM
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I guess I just don't get how fan controls work. I don't want to use anything that involves a battery or could damage the fan motor.
 
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Old 07-18-08, 03:32 PM
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I am not sure what you opposition is to a battery. Good alkalines last for a year or more.

So why not use the remote that came with the fan and as John says, affix it somewhere near where the wall switch would be.

Adding a mechanical pull chain is an option if you want to modify the fan and know how. The light is straight forward but the fan switch is not. Different manufacturers use different switch patterns. You just can't go to gome depot and buy a general purpose 3 speed fan switch and expect it to work right, especially on Hunter fans. They switch differently.

I think what you really want is wired fan and light control at a wall switch or two pull chains on the fan. Am I right?
 
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Old 07-18-08, 04:07 PM
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Right, sorta.

I already made a 2-wide hole in the plaster for the blue box. And I want it to look authentic with the push buttons.

So I just am thinking that I'll go with a wall mounted fan control. But is there any concern with using those? I thought there was a reason behind not using things like dimmers on a fan.
 
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Old 07-18-08, 06:04 PM
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The reason for not using a lighting dimmer is to avoid burning out the motor. Lighting dimmers start out on low and go higher. Using one of these to control the fan motor would be like trying to start a manual transmission car off in 3rd instead of 1st.

Fan speed controls start off in high and get slower.

PS, the hole would be easy to patch down to a single gang box.
 
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Old 07-18-08, 07:47 PM
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It really doesn't have anything to do with starting high or low. That is not a problem for a ceiling fan. They are tough motors and you can start them on low, just pull the chain quickly!

The problem is that most dimmers are not designed for inductive loads only resistive loads, like lights. There are dimmers for inductive loads, like transformers and motors but unless it is rated for the fan and the fan manufacturer recommends it I would not do it.

If you inspect the speed methods in most fans (I am familiar with Hunter) they switch in caps. They might have a 5uf and a 10uf. Low would be the 5, then 10, then 5+10, etc. as an example - not an actual case.

Before they had wireless remotes there were wired speed controls. These caps are not that large and could go in a switch box. I am not sure if they put them there or in the fan and ran multiple wires. It would be more convenient to have them in the switch box.

The wireless units use relays or triacs to do this switching in the fan body.
 
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