Electrical circuits in Kitchen

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Old 07-19-08, 11:58 PM
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Electrical circuits in Kitchen

I'm installing a Gas Range with a microwave on top. Can the electric for the Gas Range can be on same 20amp circuit as the microwave - or does the microwave have to be on its own circuit?

I ran two 20 amp circuits for the over the counter top outlets. I have not yet run a circuit for the island outlets (two outlets). Can these outlets be on the same circuits as the counter top outlets? Or do the island outlets require their own circuit?

I'm running a 20amp circuit for the dishwasher? Can I run the home run to the wall directly behind the dishwasher? Or does it need to be under the sink and then have a jumper wire to dishwasher? Im not installing a garbage disposal.
 
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Old 07-20-08, 03:49 AM
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Originally Posted by jaspers95 View Post
I'm installing a Gas Range with a microwave on top. Can the electric for the Gas Range can be on same 20amp circuit as the microwave - or does the microwave have to be on its own circuit?
No typically Microwave/Exhaust fan useally called for it own circuit { this is typically will be stated in the installment instructions }

I ran two 20 amp circuits for the over the counter top outlets. I have not yet run a circuit for the island outlets (two outlets). Can these outlets be on the same circuits as the counter top outlets? Or do the island outlets require their own circuit?
The Island countertop circuit have to be tied into the Kitchen countertop circuit OR It own GFCI circuit. { USA Kitchen countertop circuits must have GFCI Canada is very simauir to this }

I'm running a 20amp circuit for the dishwasher? Can I run the home run to the wall directly behind the dishwasher? Or does it need to be under the sink and then have a jumper wire to dishwasher? Im not installing a garbage disposal.
It depending on which type of dishwasher some can be hook up direct as long the switch do say " off " postion otherwise Cord and receptale will be need to be used for local disconnection { check with local code on this part }

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 07-20-08, 04:01 AM
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For safety

For safety much better you install another outlet, please check the circuit breaker if okey to add also the full load of your new appliance.

there's a website lots of free ebooks at http://electricalengineeringtour.blogspot.com/


Thanks Jony
 
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Old 07-20-08, 01:23 PM
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Originally Posted by jaspers95 View Post
I'm installing a Gas Range with a microwave on top. Can the electric for the Gas Range can be on same 20amp circuit as the microwave - or does the microwave have to be on its own circuit?
No the microwave circuit must be dedicated to only the microwave, but the gas range can be powered from the 20A countertop circuit.

Can these outlets be on the same circuits as the counter top outlets? Or do the island outlets require their own circuit?
Either option is allowed.

Can I run the home run to the wall directly behind the dishwasher?
In most jurisdictions it is okay to run the romex out of the wall or floor behind the dishwasher and straight into the unit. Leave about 6' so there's enough to pull the dishwasher out for service.
 
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Old 07-20-08, 03:04 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
No the microwave circuit must be dedicated to only the microwave, but the gas range can be powered from the 20A countertop circuit.
Got a code reference on that?
 
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Old 07-20-08, 03:10 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post



In most jurisdictions it is okay to run the romex out of the wall or floor behind the dishwasher and straight into the unit. Leave about 6' so there's enough to pull the dishwasher out for service.
It all depends on the HP of the dishwasher, If the dishwasher is bigger than 1/8th HP, then the disconnect must be within sight of the motor.

Now you have some options, if the DW has a unit switch that actually disconnects the ungrounded conductors and has a marked OFF position, (very unlikely) or you install a cord on the DW and a receptacle under the sink for the required disconnect, or you can install a simple toggle switch at the countertop.
 
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Old 07-21-08, 09:09 AM
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Originally Posted by Chris75 View Post
Got a code reference on that?
Sure. Article 422.16(B)(4)(5) requires an individual branch circuit for range hoods with flexible cords; and 210.23(A)(2) effectively requires a dedicated circuit for any fixed in place loads which exceed 50% of the branch circuit rating. The over-the-range microwave/hood qualifies for both articles as they are usually well in excess of 1200W.
 
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Old 07-21-08, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Sure. Article 422.16(B)(4)(5) requires an individual branch circuit for range hoods with flexible cords;
and 210.23(A)(2) effectively requires a dedicated circuit for any fixed in place loads which exceed 50% of the branch circuit rating. The over-the-range microwave/hood qualifies for both articles as they are usually well in excess of 1200W.

I'll buy 210.23(A)(2) but 422.16(B)(4)(5) only allows you to install a cord on a Range Hood, has nothing to do with a Microwave at the get go... More of a "what if scenario" than anything. Not really even sure why the NEC gets involved in these matters since its not a design manual...
 
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Old 07-21-08, 06:38 PM
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The answer I've been told is that the NEC requires that all appliances be installed per their installation manuals. All over-range microwave/hoods (or at least every one I've seen and heard of) has an installation requirement of a dedicated 15A or 20A circuit (depending on the size of the microwave). Therefore the NEC isn't really the driver of the requirement, the appliance is.

In addition, while a dedicated 15A circuit may be fine for the model that's being installed, many people recommend running a dedicated 20A for a possible future replacement.
 
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Old 07-22-08, 09:13 AM
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Originally Posted by Chris75 View Post
422.16(B)(4)(5) only allows you to install a cord on a Range Hood, has nothing to do with a Microwave at the get go
Yes, but the microwave is a range hood too. It's got a fan and vent stack -- seems like it meets the range hood criteria.

Not really even sure why the NEC gets involved in these matters since its not a design manual...
I agree with that sentiment. The only reason I can think of for requiring the dedicated receptacle is to provide easy hookup for the next guy who decides to replace a plain range hood with a microwave range hood. Still as the original installer the next guy's needs shouldn't have to be my problem.
 
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Old 07-22-08, 10:49 PM
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Back to my original question - the circuit for the gas range. Should I tap into one of the two 20amp small appliance counter top circuits? Or should I run a dedicated 15amp circuit just for the gas range? What wattage will gas ranges use? Does it matter what features it has? Double oven/Warming tray? Should I just tap into the 15amp circuit for the kitchen lights?
 
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Old 07-23-08, 04:47 AM
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Originally Posted by jaspers95 View Post
Back to my original question - the circuit for the gas range. Should I tap into one of the two 20amp small appliance counter top circuits? Or should I run a dedicated 15amp circuit just for the gas range? What wattage will gas ranges use? Does it matter what features it has? Double oven/Warming tray? Should I just tap into the 15amp circuit for the kitchen lights?
What are the specs on the unit? Does it have a electric griddle in it? This kind of info will determine what you need.
 
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Old 07-23-08, 09:34 AM
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Originally Posted by jaspers95 View Post
Back to my original question - the circuit for the gas range. Should I tap into one of the two 20amp small appliance counter top circuits?
If the gas range only uses power for the ignition and clock/control then you can use one of the 20A small-appliance branch circuits.

If the gas range also has electric heating like griddle, warming tray, etc then you need to look at the specs of the unit and probably install a dedicated circuit to supply it.
 
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