Moving 220 outlet


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Old 07-21-08, 01:12 PM
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Moving 220 outlet

Hello all,

I recently purchased an older (1920s) home which does not have an indoor 220 outlet for an electric dryer. We are having the plumbing installed this week for the washer and I am considering doing the wiring for the dryer myself.

The dryer will be installed in a mud-room against an exterior wall. I would like to move an existing 220 outlet that is currently right next to the circuit breaker to use for the dryer. Can I just run conduit along the exterior wall and punch through where I want the dryer outlet? The dryer is around the corner from about 20' away from the breaker.

Thanks in advance!

Ed
 
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Old 07-21-08, 02:05 PM
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220-volt outlets are not interchangeable. A 220-volt circuit is designed with one specific appliance in mind. There are no general-purpose 220-volt circuits as there are general-purpose 110-volt circuits.

There are several reasons why this existing 220-volt outlet may be unsuitable. We need more details, such as the specifications of the circuit breaker and the specifications of the cable. We would also need to know if anything else is on this circuit.
 
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Old 07-21-08, 02:09 PM
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You probably cannot re-use the existing receptacle. Most dryer circuits installed prior to the 1996 electrical code are no longer compliant, and therefore cannot be moved or extended.

The best thing to do is start from scratch and run #10 copper wire from the panel to the dryer receptacle. The dryer receptacle must be the four-prong type and must be fed with red, black, white and bare (or green) conductors. If you are running indoors you may use a romex cable like 10/3g. If you are running in conduit, use individual THWN conductors. Yes, the conduit may run along the exterior of the building.
 
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Old 07-21-08, 04:21 PM
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wow, thanks for the quick responses!

would it be best to use PVC or metal conduit? PVC seems much easier to work with. however, when i was looking at all the fittings I couldn't for the life of me figure out what fitting I should be using to connect the conduit to the breaker box.

How about the size of the conduit, will 1/2" work if i'm not planning on running anything else through the conduit besides the 220 line?

also, is a GFCI breaker required (or recommended) in this situation?

thanks!
ed
 
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Old 07-21-08, 04:38 PM
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Originally Posted by mrPalomar View Post
Hello all,

I recently purchased an older (1920s) home which does not have an indoor 220 outlet for an electric dryer. We are having the plumbing installed this week for the washer and I am considering doing the wiring for the dryer myself.





Ed
Love it how everyone calls a plumber because water is so dangerous and electricity is so safe...


Sorry couldn't resist...
 
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Old 07-22-08, 07:54 AM
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Originally Posted by mrPalomar View Post
would it be best to use PVC or metal conduit? PVC seems much easier to work with.
Either is acceptable. PVC is easier to work with.

however, when i was looking at all the fittings I couldn't for the life of me figure out what fitting I should be using to connect the conduit to the breaker box.
A male threaded adapter and nut.



How about the size of the conduit, will 1/2" work if i'm not planning on running anything else through the conduit besides the 220 line?
1/2" is okay for four #10s. The conduit must be fully assembled and glue dried before you pull the wires through.

also, is a GFCI breaker required (or recommended) in this situation?
No. Use a standard double-pole 30A breaker.
 
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Old 07-22-08, 11:49 AM
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thanks again for the help. i got all of the parts i needed and should have some time to take on the project tomorrow, hopefully all goes well.

is it part of some code that the wires have to be pulled through after the conduit or are there problems that occur if you do it as you go?

thanks again!

ed
 
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Old 07-22-08, 11:54 AM
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You have to wait until the conduit is in place and the glue is fully cured. PVC glue can dissolve the insulation on the wire, and that cannot be good.
 
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Old 07-22-08, 12:06 PM
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There is also a Code requirement that all raceway systems be complete before conductors are installed.
 
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Old 07-25-08, 06:10 PM
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thanks for the help guys, the installation went without a hitch!
 
 

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