Electrical boxes for kitchen counter top

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  #1  
Old 07-28-08, 08:07 PM
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Electrical boxes for kitchen counter top

When installing the plastic electrical boxes for the kitchen counter top area should the box be flush with the sheet rock or the finished wall. I'm putting tile in this area so I was wondering if I should extend the box out further to compensate for the tile, or just get longer screws for the outlets/switches and leave the box flush with sheet rock.
 
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Old 07-28-08, 08:15 PM
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You want to be flush with the finished surface or you will have to use extensions along with the long screws.

If you haven't installed the boxes yet I would recommend the adjustable type boxes. A little more expensive then the regular but worth it since you can adjust them even after the drywall/tile is in

here is a link, you can usually find these on the shelf at HD or lowes also

http://www.idealtruevalue.com/servlet/the-171848/Detail
 
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Old 07-30-08, 06:59 AM
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If I just used long screws do I really need the extension plates?

Do they make a 3 gang adjustable box? I only see a single and 2 gang adjustable box?
 
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Old 07-30-08, 08:09 AM
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Originally Posted by jaspers95 View Post
If I just used long screws do I really need the extension plates?
Yes. The exact rules on how much distance is allowed between the finished surface and the box depend on the material used for the finished surface. I might guess that it would be ceramic tile based on the fact that this is a kitchen. You don't have to be 100% flush, but you have to be close. As I said, how close depends on the material.
 
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Old 07-30-08, 05:28 PM
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Here is exact quote from NEC

" 314.20 In Wall or Ceiling.

In walls or ceilings with a surface of concrete, tile, gypsum, plaster, or other noncombustible material, boxes employing a flush-type cover or faceplate shall be installed so that the front edge of the box, plaster ring, extension ring, or listed extender will not be set back of the finished surface more than 6 mm (1/4 in.).

In walls and ceilings constructed of wood or other combustible surface material, boxes, plaster rings, extension rings, or listed extenders shall be flush with the finished surface or project therefrom.
 
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Old 07-31-08, 06:33 AM
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So if I'm interpreting 314.20 correct, the installed coxes could be up to 1/4" set back from the finished tile surface. We have not yet picked out the tile. Is all tile the same thickness? I'm not sure if we're going to use ceramic or porcelain. Hopefully the installed tile will extend more that 1/4" past the Sheetrock.

At this point my plan is still to install the boxes flush with the Sheetrock - there are a couple of boxes I need that are not adjustable (a 3 gang and and 2 gang combo (line voltage and low voltage).

Do the home centers sell electrical box extenders that will work with a multi gang box? The extenders I looked at in HomeDepot did not fit in a 2 gang box.
 
  #7  
Old 07-31-08, 08:02 PM
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The code is saying no more than a 1/4" set back from face of tile without extension. If you use an extension the box can be further back.

Here is another type of box, also adjustable.

http://www.licensedelectrician.com/Store/SmartBox.htm


or just use the carlon nail in type. They will go out as far as 1" I believe

http://www.carlon.com/Master%20Catal...0Boxes_2B1.pdf
 
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Old 08-01-08, 08:05 AM
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I advise to use "deep" "1900" tak-on boxes ,which are metal boxes approx 4" square.

You have a choice of the "depth" of the device covers which fasten to the 1900 box --- 1/2", 3/4", 1". , so you should be able to arrange to have the face of the outlet within a 1/4" of the surface finish.

I advise "deep" boxes because of the #12 wire-guage, and the size of GFI receptacles that may be needed.
 
  #9  
Old 08-01-08, 08:18 AM
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Wall tile is often 1/4" thick. However, when combined with the adhesive (mastic or mortar), it usually exceeds 1/4".

It would be better to make the boxes proud of the sheetrock before tiling.
 
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Old 08-01-08, 01:11 PM
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yes, they do make double gang extension rings. HD and Lowes did not have them. I got one at ACE. They are plastic and come in various depths--1/8" 1/4" 3/8" 1/2" and the other was either 5/8" or 3/4". they are $2-$3 each. I have a lot of metal boxes that are set too deep because my house is old and has plaster walls but then had drywall put over top of the drywall. Previously I could not find metal double gang extension, so I used two of the single gang metal extensions and bent the sides straight to create a double gang metal extension. I don't know if this would be allowed and I may revisit that box and put in a plastic one made for double gang.

Bill
 
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Old 08-24-09, 07:54 PM
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I've completed the tile in the back splash and now I'm trying to put the electrical outlet cover plates on. The problem is, there is tile behind the screw holes for the cover plate. Was I supposed to leave room for the cover plate screw holes when cutting the tile to fit around the outlets? I only left enough room so the outlet screws would fit into the electrical box.
 
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Old 08-24-09, 08:03 PM
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It's a little tricky to do, but you could shorten the plate screws with a grinder and some pliers. You could also use a tile drill bit or rotozip/dremel tile bit to make an indentation for the screw. A final suggestion would be to try the new screwless plates which sort of snap on.
 
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Old 08-24-09, 08:09 PM
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Remove the receptacle and use a Dremel Tool to slot the tile up enough for the screw to clear the screw.
 
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