creating a 220V extension cord

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-01-08, 11:43 AM
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Jul 2008
Posts: 2
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
creating a 220V extension cord

I am currently trying to make a 220V extension cord for a welder with an interesting plug and have an odd question. I am planning on having the male end be a 6 foot dryer cable (because I only have a dryer 220 outlet in my house) and have the female end be a NEMA L620 outlet. I have 12 AWG cable for the middle with green, white, and black wire colors. the male end is ready, but I do not know whether the white "neutral" wire should go to the X or the Y slot. The plug on the welder is labeled with a W where the X slot is on the outlet.
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-01-08, 12:22 PM
Member
Join Date: Aug 2008
Posts: 1
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Stop

You don't seem to have enough knowlegde to continue and are going to hurt yourself and/or others.
Go by the proper size wire for the "middle"
Here is my suggestion. Make two cords. The longer one will be a proper cord for your welder...and a short "cheater cord" to go from the dryer plug to welder plug.
Please make sure ALL wire is able to handle the supply aperage!!!
 
  #3  
Old 08-01-08, 07:01 PM
Member
Join Date: Oct 2007
Location: Delray Beach, FL
Posts: 406
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Since it is 220, it doesn't matter.
What type of cable are you using?
You realize that you are connecting to a 30 amp circuit don't you?
 
  #4  
Old 08-02-08, 11:03 AM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Is there any reason why can't you just run new welder circuit ??


Oh by the way Ukraine1.,,

I have 12 AWG cable for the middle with green, white, and black wire colors.

This set up is NOT allowed for safety reason the 12 gauge cable is way too small for welder useage.

For common stick arc welder they need at least #8 gauge or larger conductor to use properly. { The NEC have specal code for this and it will be diffrent than the genral circuits }

For other type of welder please let us know due there are quite few diffrent type of welder on market like Arc welder . MIG welder, TIG welder etc

Get the model number of that welder and the ampcapcity from the nameplate info like voltage , amp that two circital part { with welder please let us know the duty cycle as well it will affect the wire size as well }

Merci,Marc
 
  #5  
Old 08-02-08, 05:16 PM
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Mar 2005
Location: USA - N.E.Tn
Posts: 46,498
Received 166 Votes on 147 Posts
I made an extension cord for my arc welder. I used #8 wire with a stove plug on 1 end and a stove recepticle on the other. I don't use it often but it works well when I need it.
You would use dryer plug/ends if using a 30 amp circuit.
 
  #6  
Old 08-03-08, 09:31 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: Kingston, PA
Posts: 137
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I agree with the warnings posted above. Electric arc welders have specialized power supply circuits, depending on the complete nameplate data (amps, duty-cycle, etc.).
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: