Doubling up wires on the neutral bus

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Old 08-06-08, 09:50 AM
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Sorry to temporarily hijack, but doesn't 2008 NEC state that you cannot double up any wires on the neutral buss?
 
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Old 08-06-08, 10:11 AM
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There's not quite such a thing as a "neutral bus", but it is true that every neutral wire must be in a bus hole by itself.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 10:28 AM
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The "neutral wires" (technically grounded conductors) cannot be doubled up. The grounds may be installed per the panel manufacturer's rating which usually allows double or triple on a screw.

408.41 Grounded Conductor Terminations. Each grounded conductor shall terminate within the panelboard in an individual terminal that is not also used for another conductor.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 01:33 PM
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For the logic of this requirement, see here
 
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Old 08-06-08, 02:28 PM
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Interesting Michael. Thanks for posting that link.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 11:34 PM
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Originally Posted by John Nelson View Post
There's not quite such a thing as a "neutral bus"
Out of curiosity, what is it called then? I'm still learning and would like to know the correct terminology.

I was told by an electrician that starting with 2008, you couldn't even double up 2 grounds... Still haven't laid hands on one so I just assumed it was true.

Sorry for the thread split, whomever did it. I just figured it would be relevant information for the OP of the other thread since he asked about it.
 
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Old 08-06-08, 11:37 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
408.41 Grounded Conductor Terminations. Each grounded conductor shall terminate within the panelboard in an individual terminal that is not also used for another conductor.
Oi. I'm confused. Wouldn't that cover ground wires? I read that to say "you cannont double up grounds"...
 
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Old 08-07-08, 12:22 AM
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Originally Posted by madpenguin View Post
Oi. I'm confused. Wouldn't that cover ground wires? I read that to say "you cannont double up grounds"...

I know it can be confusing with the word " ground "

The real words and it own meaning

Grounded is common as netural or centre tap of transfomer connection. ( yes, it is a current carry conductor.)

Grounding is used for bonding , grounding to serve if the ungrounded conductor touch the grounding it will trip the breaker or trip the GFCI. ( No ., This is not a current carry conductor )

Ungrounded gernally mean hot conductor

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 08-07-08, 09:27 AM
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In electrical code terms versus common language:

ungrounded conductor = hot wire
grounded conductor = neutral wire
equipment grounding conductor = ground wire

While both equipment grounding conductors and grounded conductors are connected to the soil, the principle difference is that grounded conductors normally carry current as part of the circuit whereas equipment grounding conductors only carry current during an abnormal or fault condition.

I know it is confusing to apply these terms to residential electrical systems where "ground" and "neutral" are straightforward, but it really does matter when you look at the complicated multiphase commercial and industrial systems terms like "ground" and "neutral" could have very ambiguous meanings. The code language has to clearly apply to all possible systems.
 
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