15amp Single Pole- 6ft heater

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Old 08-07-08, 05:39 PM
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15amp Single Pole- 6ft heater

Will i be ok to run a 6ft 2000 watt 240 volt electric baseboard heater off a 15 amp single pole breaker with 14/2 wire???

Will this work? The wire is already in place and would be a lot of work to re wire.
 
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Old 08-07-08, 06:39 PM
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A single pole breaker only gives you 120v. You need a 2 pole, 240v breaker. The 14-2 wire is ok if you use a 15 amp breaker. The white wire should be colored or otherwise marked red (or black) at both ends.
 
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Old 08-07-08, 07:42 PM
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And a "tandem" or "twin" or "skinny" breaker will not do, even if it is labeled as double pole.
 
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Old 08-07-08, 08:18 PM
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So with the double pole you still wire it up the same in the breaker box as the single pole? black to negative and white (red)wire into the switch?

Thanks for the help
Matt
 
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Old 08-07-08, 09:56 PM
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With a double pole breaker you have two connections on the breaker. Since this is a 240 volt only device you have no neutral. The black and white wires go to the two connections on the double pole breaker. The bare ground wire goes to the ground bus in the panel.

While I do not think it is a requirement, you can mark the white wire red tape or with a red permanent marker to indicate it is not a neutral.
 
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Old 08-07-08, 10:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Mattbchillin View Post
So with the double pole you still wire it up the same in the breaker box as the single pole? black to negative and white (red)wire into the switch?
No. Negative is a term associated with DC circuits. Your home wiring is AC.

There are no switches in the electric panel. There are breakers. (Yes they look like switches and can interrupt the flow of electricity but they are not called switches.)

Red goes to one pole of the breaker. Black goes to the other pole. Ground goes to the ground bar if present or the neutral bar if no ground bar.
 
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Old 08-08-08, 12:14 AM
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I thought he said he was using 14/2 cable? where does thie red wire come from? He should be dealing with Black and white unless the white was taped or marked in some way.
 
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Old 08-08-08, 12:16 AM
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Do not let this fairly simple operation confuse you. The red wire that keeps being refered to is not actually red. The person who said red is talking about phasing your wire. Yes, It certainly is a code requirement to either put black, red etc. tape on a wire that no longer functions as a neutral. You can even take your favorite marker and accomplish the same thing. In order not to confuse people down the road, once you have changed a wire to 220 volt and are using the white wire to achieve this then it must be marked something other than white. I prefer black for less confusion, but others like lavender. A word of caution is a 15 amp circuit will not take anymore than you describe. Do not push that circuit to much farther
 
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Old 08-08-08, 02:00 PM
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Originally Posted by Mattbchillin View Post
Will this work? The wire is already in place and would be a lot of work to re wire.
Is this a new or existing wire that you are certain is not in use?

Your baseboard will need a separate thermostat - is that already wired in?
 
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Old 08-08-08, 02:05 PM
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Baseboard heaters can either have a wall mounted or t-stat or one that mounts in the end of the unit.

To serve as the disconnect it would need to break all the ungrounded conductors and have a marked "off" position.
 
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Old 08-08-08, 03:21 PM
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Thanks for the information, yes it already has thermostat.

This has been very helpfull, looks like the baseboard heaters will be going in this weekend.

Thanks so much for all the help!!!

Matt
 
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