Wiring New Electric Range/Oven from Electric Cooktop

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Old 08-11-08, 02:10 PM
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Wiring New Electric Range/Oven from Electric Cooktop

We originally had a electric cooktop and a separate wall oven. We are now installing a range/oven where the cooktop was. When I disconnected the cooktop, I realized it was hardwired. It was connected with 3-wire (14gauge) flexible conduit coming from the side of the cabinet into a box on the wall under the cooktop, then to the cooktop with more flexible conduit. Written on the cabinet was "220v junction box behind this cabinet". In order to access this, I have to go in the basement and come up from under and behind the dishwasher. It is set on an angle in the corner. I could see two of the flexible conduits coming from the wall. One going to the cooktop and the other to the oven. Accessing this junction box in next to near impossible without removing the dishwasher. Can I just connect the new range with the existing wires and leave the old oven connected? Or, do I need to disconnect the old oven and only have the new range/oven connected from the junction box? Thanks for any help.
 
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Old 08-11-08, 03:20 PM
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Before anyone can answer you need to provide both the voltage and the ampacity of both the new oven and the existing wiring.

If your wiring is 14 ga, which I doubt, you will need to run new wiring. Most ovens require a 240 volt, 30 amp or greater circuit.
 
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Old 08-11-08, 04:01 PM
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I checked at the breaker and it looks like the circuit is 50amps, based on the fact that the double is labed 50. The oven is listed as 120v/240v, 11.0kw. Not sure about the wire. I have some 14gauge and eyeballed the size. That's why I thought it was 14. Is that the information needed?
Thanks
 
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Old 08-11-08, 05:41 PM
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The wire in a piece of #14 is about the size of regular pencil lead. It is only good for 15 amps, way too small for 50 amps.

Number 8 or #6 wire is roughly the size of a pencil.
 
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Old 08-11-08, 05:59 PM
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Yes. It looks like 14. I guess I should try to look inside the junction if I can. Should I be using #6? What is recommended?
 
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Old 08-11-08, 07:24 PM
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Yes, you should use 6/3 with ground. If you read the installation manual carefully, it may allow you to use 8/3 (or maybe even 8/2 or 6/2). If you post the make and model of your new unit, along with the city in which you live, we may be able to offer more specific advice.
 

Last edited by John Nelson; 08-11-08 at 07:43 PM.
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Old 08-11-08, 08:31 PM
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Thanks,
The range/oven is a Frigidaire: Model - FES366EC6.

Would it be best to just disconnect the old oven when I re-wire from the junction? I still haven't gotten back there to look at it yet?
Thanks for all the advice
 
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Old 08-12-08, 10:21 PM
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Question

Here is a link for the instruction manual.

ftp://ftp.electrolux-na.com/ProdInfo.../318201611.pdf

Page 6 shows installation.
I was able to access the junction and disconnect the wall oven.
Inside the junction was only 3 wires; they seem to be alluminum.
I then ran 6/2 from the junction through the cabinet behind the oven location and plan to connect to a floating 3-prong receptacle.
I connected inside the junction with 6/2 as follows:
black-black
red-red
bare allum-bare copper
Is this correct?
Thanks for helping
 
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Old 08-12-08, 10:36 PM
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If the range was pure 240v you might be able to extend a three wire circuit but the instructions you posted say it comes with the neutral bonded to the frame. It is therefore a 120/240 appliance and must have a four wire hook up. The neutral will be disconnected from the frame as per instructions. You will need to run new cable or wire.

If you had not extended the cable it would be grandfathered (local code permitting) but extending it means it must be brought up to current code.
 
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Old 08-12-08, 10:47 PM
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Yes that is correct for the exsting 3 wire set up but if you relocated { move to diffrent place } then no it is not legal per NEC code.

And make sure you double check the bonding strap if it have in the unit.

with the 3 wire cord the bonding strap stay there unless you got the 4 wire cord the bonding strap do come off at the termail locataion.

Merci,Marc
 
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Old 08-13-08, 04:07 AM
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So I need to run a 6/3 wire from the junction?
If this is the case, how would I wire that at the junction?
Does this also mean I need to get a four prong cord or can I still use the three prong cord?
Thanks
 
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Old 08-13-08, 07:34 AM
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So I need to run a 6/3 wire from the junction?
No. You need to run 6/3 with ground (H-H-N-Grd) from the breaker box to the new location for your 4 wire range receptacle.

If this is the case, how would I wire that at the junction?
Answered above

Does this also mean I need to get a four prong cord or can I still use the three prong cord?
This question is a little more complicated if you still desire to use the existing 3 wire supply from the breaker panel to the jb location.

If you run new 50 amp cable then yes you will need to purchase a 50 amp 4 wire range cord and 14-50R range receptacle. A proper junction box that will accept the receptacle will also be needed.

As to what you have done already...you have a few mistakes.

1.) You cannot extend what appears to be a an aluminum 2 conductor with neutral SE-U cable.
2.) You cannot connect aluminum to copper with direct contact between the wires, special connectors are required.
 
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Old 08-13-08, 08:44 AM
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Thanks,
It's looking like I should get a professional to complete the installation; to be safe.
 
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