add a receptacle to a dedicated circuit?


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Old 08-23-08, 03:53 AM
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add a receptacle to a dedicated circuit?

I have a dedicated 240 V circuit powering an irrigation pump about 30 feet from my house. Against code, I am considering adding a receptacle outlet beside this pump. The wire powering the pump has three conductors, two hot and one bare (safety ground) wire. IF I am going to do this, which of these two approaches is least bad:
- Connect the bare wire to the neutral and safety ground of the receptacle and to the safety ground connection point on the pump.
- Drive and connect a local ground rod as the safety ground and connect the bare wire only to the neutral on the receptacle.

I know this is cold comfort, but it seems unlikely that a person would touch both something plugged into this receptacle and something plugged in elsewhere, given the distance from the house.
Furthermore, since my dedicated circuit breaker is not GFI, could I use a GFI receptacle? A subpanel has been suggested, could that approach be used to meet code? Thanks!
 
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Old 08-23-08, 06:36 AM
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You will not get the info on how to do something both against Code and also potentially deadly here.

Do it right or don't do it at all. It is every worse that you know this is wrong even before asking.
 
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Old 08-23-08, 07:41 AM
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Codes, especially ones like these, are there because people have been killed doing things like this, back before there were codes.

- Connect the bare wire to the neutral and safety ground of the receptacle and to the safety ground connection point on the pump.
The receptacle will work like this, but there is a good potential for there to be voltage on the metal portions of the pump. Especially considering that it involves water, depending on the construction of the pump, it could pretty easily put voltage on the water that's being pumped.

- Drive and connect a local ground rod as the safety ground and connect the bare wire only to the neutral on the receptacle.
Two problems here. Same as above, connecting ground to neutral allows the possibility of metal parts having voltage on them, and second, you now have two ground paths (which you're not supposed to have in your house). This can cause potential between the ground rod at the pump and the ground at the house. All sorts of bad things can happen, especially during a storm - without even talking about lightning strikes.

Additionally, one more issue, a 30A breaker can not protect a general purpose receptacle. The extension cord, wire, and device is likely to burn up before the breaker trips if there is a fault.
 
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Old 08-23-08, 11:13 AM
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Besides the blatent code violations and safety issues, 30 feet is a ridiculuosly short distance to make you even consider doing this.

Buy a 50 foot extension cord, or

Spend the 70 bucks in materials and install a new circuit for the outdoor receptacle yourself, or

Hire an electrician.

But whatever you do, go in front of a mirror, smack yourself for coming up with this idea even though you know it is dangerous, and please do not ever work on yours or anyone else's electrical system.

willis
 
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Old 08-24-08, 06:53 PM
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Thank you all for your replies.
 
 

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