Well Pump Breaker Tripping

Reply

  #1  
Old 08-25-08, 06:47 PM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well Pump Breaker Tripping

Hi All,

Wasn't sure whether to put this in electrical or plumbing, but since I didn't see anything about water pumps, I figured I'd run it by you guys.

I have a 3/4HP well pump, less than 10 years old, which has worked flawlessly until the past month or so. The problem is that it trips a breaker now and then. No rhyme or reason as to why/when, though. It does this maybe once a day, maybe two times and maybe not at all .

The double breaker (can't tell exactly if it's a 30 or 40) is very hard to turn totally off and back on after it trips. My first idea is to change that sucker. I've never had one go out before, but I guess it does happen. Maybe they weaken over time, no? The house is less than 10 years old.

One other thing: The pressure is turned up to about 90. That may be too much, but when I tried to adjust it downward, the "switches" (points?) don't want to work properly. I must say that I don't understand all I know about that little box, though . The equipment is by Goulds.

1. What's the possibility of the breaker being weak?
2. If anyone knows how to adjust the pressure, I'd appreciate knowing.

Regards,

Jim
 
Sponsored Links
  #2  
Old 08-25-08, 07:00 PM
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: Eastern Georgia
Posts: 486
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Jim,
is it a submersible pump or a jet pump? As to the pressure switch there should be 2 adjusting screws, one is the tall one that protrudes thru the cover, the other is shorter and to the side of the first. To lower the pressure turn the nut on the tall adjuster counter clockwise. You might have to turn it 3 or 4 turns to get the desired pressure. Turn it one turn, open a hose bib, let it run until the pump cuts on, shut valve and wait for pump to cut off. If the pressure is what you want good, if not repeat above procedure until you get where you want to be. Goes with out saying there is live voltage in the switch so watch where you put your fingers/tools.
 
  #3  
Old 08-25-08, 07:11 PM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by wire twister View Post
Jim,
is it a submersible pump or a jet pump? As to the pressure switch there should be 2 adjusting screws, one is the tall one that protrudes thru the cover, the other is shorter and to the side of the first. To lower the pressure turn the nut on the tall adjuster counter clockwise. You might have to turn it 3 or 4 turns to get the desired pressure. Turn it one turn, open a hose bib, let it run until the pump cuts on, shut valve and wait for pump to cut off. If the pressure is what you want good, if not repeat above procedure until you get where you want to be. Goes with out saying there is live voltage in the switch so watch where you put your fingers/tools.
Thanks, Twister. The pump is submersible. As to the adjustment: Yes, turning the tall screw to the left will lower the pressure, but don't you have to be careful and make sure the other one is also turned to the proper setting? That is what I didn't understand.

Do you think that the high pressure might be overworking the pump and causing it to trip the breaker?

Or is it more likely a weak breaker?

All sorts of questions, eh?

I appreciate your help.

Regards,

Jim
 
  #4  
Old 08-25-08, 07:48 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
The Hp motor at 240 volts will useally draw about 7 or so amp and normally 15 or 20 amp breaker will handle it very nice.


I hope you did turn down the water pressure 90 is pretty high normally most place I did see the settiing useally are 20/40 , 30/50 , 40/60 sometime other but the three is most common pressure setting

I really don't think overpressure will tax the motor it more likely something else like weak capaitor or bad bearing or impeller is shot.

But some submersble well do have three wire controller and two wire verison if somehow you got the control box near the pressure switch and some case the starting relay can get screwy and fail to function what it should be.

That something you want to check it out if you have a control panel next to the pressure switch otherwise if you have true two wire pump then disregurd my last pargraph.

Merci,Marc
 
  #5  
Old 08-25-08, 08:03 PM
waterwelldude's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: S.E. Texas
Posts: 1,042
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
[quote=desertjim;1418738]Thanks, Twister. The pump is submersible. As to the adjustment: Yes, turning the tall screw to the left will lower the pressure, but don't you have to be careful and make sure the other one is also turned to the proper setting? That is what I didn't understand.quote]

The tall screw is the cut in and cut out. The smaller screw is the differential between on and off. Most are 20# You shouldn't have to turn the smaller one.

The reason the breaker is tripping is probably a bad capacitor. If you have a two wire(no control box) the motor could be bad. The high pressure will not incress the amps of the motor more than 3 or 4. Not enough to trip the breaker. The shut off pressure is around 120psi for that pump( the max pressure the pump can pump).I would not go above 60 or 65psi.

Travis
 

Last edited by waterwelldude; 08-25-08 at 08:33 PM.
  #6  
Old 08-25-08, 08:24 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 376
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
From what you describe I would think a 20A 2 pole breaker (30A tops) would be required for the motor.

90 PSI is way out of the intended range for the motor and certainly could contribute to an overload. How are you measuring this pressure? Often the gages are rusted out and wrong. The maximum pressure should be no more than 60 PSI, with 40 PSI cut in and preferably 50 PSI with a cut in of 30 PSI. Depending on how deep your well is anything above that is putting a tremendous load on your pump and it also is way to much pressure for your system. It really stresses things like washing machine hoses, etc.

First I would get the pressure set correctly. Then see how it goes. Beyond that it could be many things, the capacitor, sand or grit loading the puimp, Motor problems in general, a bearing or winding or a ground fault.

You can check for the ground fault with a meter. With the power totally disconnected you should see a very high or infinite resistance from either side of the kines to the pump measured to ground.
 
  #7  
Old 08-25-08, 09:32 PM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by waterwelldude View Post

The tall screw is the cut in and cut out. The smaller screw is the differential between on and off. Most are 20# You shouldn't have to turn the smaller one.

The reason the breaker is tripping is probably a bad capacitor. If you have a two wire(no control box) the motor could be bad. The high pressure will not incress the amps of the motor more than 3 or 4. Not enough to trip the breaker. The shut off pressure is around 120psi for that pump( the max pressure the pump can pump).I would not go above 60 or 65psi.

Travis
Thanks, Travis.

I'm gonna try the adjustment again tomorrow and see what happens. It's still too high.

The capacitor! Someone else mentioned that to my wife. How does one know if the capacitor is bad?

The one in my control box is about the size of a large D Cell battery. Maybe a little shorter and fatter. It's black.

Thanks for your help..............thanks to ALL who have replied.

Regards,

JR
 
  #8  
Old 08-25-08, 10:07 PM
waterwelldude's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Jun 2008
Location: S.E. Texas
Posts: 1,042
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
On the bottom of the capacitor there will be 2 wires, and a small hole. That hole will have balck tar looking stuff comming out, or what looks like some kind of leak from around the edge, if its bad.

Turn the power OFF before working on any thing electrical.

Travis
 
  #9  
Old 08-25-08, 10:48 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
The DIY test for a capacitor is replacement. While a bad one will leak there is a possibility of a problem with no visible leak.
 
  #10  
Old 08-26-08, 10:11 AM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dsc3507 View Post
From what you describe I would think a 20A 2 pole breaker (30A tops) would be required for the motor.
certainly could contribute to an overload. How are you measuring this pressure? Often the gages are rusted out and
90 PSI is way out of the intended range for the motor and wrong. The maximum pressure should be no more than 60 PSI, with 40 PSI cut in and preferably 50 PSI with a cut in of 30 PSI.
Something's awry. I just turned to tall adjuster way to the left and turned on the water in two places. The gauge went way past 100. Now I have the pump off and letting the tank empty. Then I'll see what happens when I turn it back on.

BTW, it has THREE wires. The capacitor looks great.....like new.

Ok, now! After the tank drained out (well, at least the water
stopped) the gauge read 55PSI. When I turned it back on, it
built up to 100+ again.

Bad gauge? It also looks good

So, right now the range seems to be 55-100+.

Why would it read 55PSI if it were empty ?

Questions, questions, questions .

Thanks muchly!
 
  #11  
Old 08-26-08, 11:00 AM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Not a pump expert but is the pressure tank air-bound? Does it have a free airspace or a balder? Ruptured bladder? Have you tried bleeding the airspace. Just guesses on things to try. At the big box store I have seen pressure gauges that screw on a hose bib. IIRC not that expensive and would confirm your pressure.

More on topic for this forum it would be helpful if you could take a reading of the starting current with an amprobe and how long till it drops to run current.
 
  #12  
Old 08-26-08, 12:49 PM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Not a pump expert but is the pressure tank air-bound? Does it have a free airspace or a balder? Ruptured bladder? Have you tried bleeding the airspace. Just guesses on things to try. At the big box store I have seen pressure gauges that screw on a hose bib. IIRC not that expensive and would confirm your pressure.

Not sure, Ray. It's a Goulds Model #WM14-WB. I have a booklet on it here somewhere. BTW, it's rated at 120PSI max. I have never thought we had enough water pressure here, so I turned it up a couple years ago. Still not real happy with the water pressure where it is. I asked my wife to pick up a pressure gauge since she's in town at the hardware store.

The tank does have a something like a valve stem on the top of it, under a cover. Would a guy bleed it like letting air out of a tire, maybe?


More on topic for this forum it would be helpful if you could take a reading of the starting current with an amprobe and how long till it drops to run current.
I'll get to that later today, maybe. I don't feel up to par at the moment.

Thanks for your help.

Jim
 
  #13  
Old 08-26-08, 06:26 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 376
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
First you drain ALL water from the tank. Then using a tire pressure gage, and a pump if you need more air, you set the air pressure in the tank to the value of the low cutout of the pump switch minus a few pounds. In other words if you have a 30/50 system you set it to about 28 and in a 40/60 system you set it to about 38. Add or remove air to achieve this. Remember this is with a water empty tank.

Most newer tanks have a bladder. Like a tire tube inside so the water and air do not mix and it will then not become water logged. As the tank ages the bladder can leak and then you will need to check this more often. The symptom of the tank being water logged is more frequent pump starts.
 
  #14  
Old 08-26-08, 07:24 PM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
First you drain ALL water from the tank. Then using a tire pressure gage, and a pump if you need more air, you set the air pressure in the tank to the value of the low cutout of the pump switch minus a few pounds. In other words if you have a 30/50 system you set it to about 28 and in a 40/60 system you set it to about 38. Add or remove air to achieve this. Remember this is with a water empty tank.

I see. So then, the 55 PSI that is registering is air? So if it's at 55, then 45 would put it at 100? Am I thinking straight? I'm still gonna have to play with it, right? I have no idea where the low cutout is? Right now I would guess it's at 55. I know its adjustment is the smaller of the two springs.

Most newer tanks have a bladder. Like a tire tube inside so the water and air do not mix and it will then not become water logged. As the tank ages the bladder can leak and then you will need to check this more often. The symptom of the tank being water logged is more frequent pump starts.

This tank doesn't have a bladder, so I guess I won't concern myself with that.

I did have my wife pick up a new breaker today....just in case its a weak breaker.

The tank isn't gonna suffer from the high PSI. And nothing within the system has indicated any problem. My main concern is putting too much on the pump. Don't want to have to drag that sucker out. I just had to do that with my septic pump........and that was relatively easy......certainly not deep.


Many Thanks,

Jim
 
  #15  
Old 08-26-08, 10:59 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
Water is not compressible. The compressed air trapped at the top of the tank provides the actual pressure. Think of the air like a compressed spring. It is what pusses the water out. You could say you are measuring air pressure not water since it is the air only exerting the pressure.
 
  #16  
Old 08-26-08, 11:32 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 376
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
You mentioned the tank has a valve stem on top of it. If it does then it likely has a bladder.

The pressure you measure at this valve stem with the tank empty is strictly the air pressure. you will see nothing on the water pressure gage at that point.

Well water tanks must have air in the tank at the proper proportion. Without it the pump would cycle on and off rapidly and it's life would be greatly reduced. As mentioned in a prior message water does not compress, air does,

Perhaps you should get someone in there that knows what they are doing. Sometimes it pays in the long run. The cost to replace this stuff sure out weighs the cost of a service call.
 
  #17  
Old 08-26-08, 11:46 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 376
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
By the way.... in checking submersible pump literature in no case do I see a rating of more than 40/60 PSI mentioned. In fact there is a requirement for a 100-125 psi pressure relief. If one of these tanks blew up with 100 psi + pressure it could certainly kill you.

I have no idea why you have inadequate pressure but 40/60 psi or even 30/50 psi is certainly adequate for any 2 story residential home. Boosting the pressure is not the answer for clogged pipes, etc. Do you have iron pipe in your house?
 
  #18  
Old 08-27-08, 08:37 AM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Water is not compressible. The compressed air trapped at the top of the tank provides the actual pressure. Think of the air like a compressed spring. It is what pusses the water out. You could say you are measuring air pressure not water since it is the air only exerting the pressure.
So the pressure gauge is measuring the pressure coming "out" of the tank? That means, then, that the pressure coming into the tank is constant! Now I'm getting it. However, the pump still has to pump "into/up to" that pressure, right?

Like I said, "I don't understand all I know about those things" .

Thanks, Ray.

Jim
 
  #19  
Old 08-27-08, 09:02 AM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dsc3507 View Post
You mentioned the tank has a valve stem on top of it. If it does then it likely has a bladder.

They call it an "air cell" and it's replaceable. So, I guess that's what you are referring to.

The pressure you measure at this valve stem with the tank empty is strictly the air pressure. you will see nothing on the water pressure gage at that point.

I saw that it read 55 PSI yesterday.

Well water tanks must have air in the tank at the proper proportion. Without it the pump would cycle on and off rapidly and it's life would be greatly reduced. As mentioned in a prior message water does not compress, air does,

I thought I "had it", but if the air goes into the bladder, how does the air help force the water out?

Perhaps you should get someone in there that knows what they are doing. Sometimes it pays in the long run. The cost to replace this stuff sure out weighs the cost of a service call.
You may be correct. However, since I'm mechanically inclined, I figured if there were some folks on here who were "well system inclined", I could save that $.

Many Thanks.
 
  #20  
Old 08-27-08, 09:21 AM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dsc3507 View Post
By the way.... in checking submersible pump literature in no case do I see a rating of more than 40/60 PSI mentioned. In fact there is a requirement for a 100-125 psi pressure relief. If one of these tanks blew up with 100 psi + pressure it could certainly kill you.
I was referring to the pressure rating of the tank.
I have no idea why you have inadequate pressure but 40/60 psi or even 30/50 psi is certainly adequate for any 2 story residential home. Boosting the pressure is not the answer for clogged pipes, etc. Do you have iron pipe in your house?
No. PVC, and they are only 10 years old. As I read it, the suggested drawdown is 14.1/53.5 (http://************/62r8gj)BTW,
 
  #21  
Old 08-27-08, 02:30 PM
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: NE Wis / Paris France{ In France for now }
Posts: 4,808
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Desertjim.,,

Will you please fix the link it is a bad one

Merci,Marc
 
  #22  
Old 08-27-08, 03:05 PM
ray2047's Avatar
Member
Join Date: Mar 2006
Location: USA
Posts: 33,597
Received 13 Votes on 11 Posts
There could be two unrelated problems. A failing pump, perhaps bearings, that is occasionally tripping the breaker and an unrelated problem with the pressure regulator. I'd replace the pressure regulator and see what happens. Just my opinion, could be wrong.
 
  #23  
Old 08-27-08, 03:38 PM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by french277V View Post
Will you please fix the link it is a bad one
Merci,Marc
It was "good" when I left it. I thought they might have stripped it and added the astericks.

Try this:

http://www.wwpp.us/wellmate/wm-tank.shtml

If that doesn't work, try this.

http:// tinyurl . com /5m2uvk

Weird! In previewing this, the first one seems to parse into a link, but not the second one. Maybe they don't like tiny url. .

Regards,

Jim
 

Last edited by ibpooks; 08-27-08 at 04:05 PM. Reason: fixed link -- moderator note: the website software seems to have mucked up the second link. Remove spaces to view.
  #24  
Old 08-27-08, 11:53 PM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 376
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
I went to the web site and I see nothing about pressure other than maximum pressure which is 100 PSI. This is a maximum NOT a working pressure which would be considerably less.

The design pressure is NOT determined by the tank but rather the whole system and especially the pump. As I said before all residential submersible well pumps I have seen are spec'ed for a maximum of 60 PSI.

There is only one water inlet/outlet to the tank, so there is no in and out. The pump pumps water into the tank and then it is used out of the tank. The bladder is like a rubber inner tube at the top. as the water is pumped in it compresses the bladder. As it is pumped out the bladder expands and helps push the water out. The reason there is a bladder is that if there were just air at the top of the tank eventually it would mix with the water and and leave the tank and it would be a maintenance issue.

You can buy new pressure switches at Home Depot or any plumbing supply for a reasonable price. They are usually pre-set.
 
  #25  
Old 08-28-08, 07:51 AM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dsc3507 View Post
I went to the web site and I see nothing about pressure other than maximum pressure which is 100 PSI. This is a maximum NOT a working pressure which would be considerably less.

I believe you may have misread it, but that's a moot point based on what you said below.

The design pressure is NOT determined by the tank but rather the whole system and especially the pump. As I said before all residential submersible well pumps I have seen are spec'ed for a maximum of 60 PSI.

Inasmuch as I have been using those pressure settings (maybe the gauge isn't working correctly) for the past couple or three years, doesn't that mean that my system can probably handle that pressure (whatever it "really" is)?

There is only one water inlet/outlet to the tank, so there is no in and out. The pump pumps water into the tank and then it is used out of the tank. The bladder is like a rubber inner tube at the top. as the water is pumped in it compresses the bladder. As it is pumped out the bladder expands and helps push the water out. The reason there is a bladder is that if there were just air at the top of the tank eventually it would mix with the water and and leave the tank and it would be a maintenance issue.

So having more/less air in the tank, as someone suggested doing, has no effect on the pressure?

It would seem to me that the more air you have in the bladder, the less water the tank can hold? Am I wrong? So how can the air in the bladder determine the pressure I see at the gauge (also as someone said)? I can see that the larger the bladder is expanded with air, the longer the pressure is sustained, but as to the pressure reading, it still seems that that pressure must be applied by the pump. How am I wrong? This is just a question for understanding, not that it will help me correct the problem .


You can buy new pressure switches at Home Depot or any plumbing supply for a reasonable price. They are usually pre-set.
That might be a pregnant idea !
 
  #26  
Old 08-28-08, 08:06 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 376
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
There is a procedure for setting the air pressure. I described one in a prior response which should be pretty much how to do it BUT you should check the manufacturers instructions for your tank.

The air pressure does not set the water pressure. It determines how much the bladder expands and contracts. First you set the air pressure with an empty tank then you turn on the pump and set the water pressure.

I think you said the bladder measured 55 PSI??? This may have been with water in the tank. When the water compresses the air the air pressure will go up. You need to check the air pressure with an empty tank.

I thought you were getting a gage to check this???
 
  #27  
Old 08-28-08, 09:02 AM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dsc3507 View Post
There is a procedure for setting the air pressure. I described one in a prior response which should be pretty much how to do it BUT you should check the manufacturers instructions for your tank.

The air pressure does not set the water pressure. It determines how much the bladder expands and contracts. First you set the air pressure with an empty tank then you turn on the pump and set the water pressure.

I think you said the bladder measured 55 PSI??? This may have been with water in the tank. When the water compresses the air the air pressure will go up. You need to check the air pressure with an empty tank.

I thought you were getting a gage to check this???
Thanks. If you folks continue with your kindness, I'll figure this thing out one of these days.

I misunderstood what was said about the water pressure not registering on the gauge.

EXACTLY what causes the pressure shown on the gauge?

With the tank EMPTY, the gauge read 55. With it FULL and when it cuts off the gauge registgered 100+.

I understand how to release air or to add air, thanks to you.

So, let me understand this: With the tank empty the gauge should read what pressure? The bladder pressure..... pressure created by the bladder within the empty tank?

Than I fill it and see what the pressure reads then?

Specs are between 47-53, but at what reading.....empty or full??

I have no problem with the mechanics of it, but need to understand exactly the specifics of the operation.

As to the gauge......the dude at the hardware store sold my wife the inline gauge (likes on it already) rather than the hose bib one. It may need the new one anyway. I'll find out when I get back out there and check the air in the bladder.

Many Thanks!

BTW.....How do you set up a custom avatar?

 
  #28  
Old 08-28-08, 11:13 AM
Member
Join Date: Jul 2008
Location: USA
Posts: 376
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Ok one more time....

The air gage (tire gage pushed on valve at top of tank) and the water pressure gage are two different things!

If you turn off the pump and totally empty the tank of water there should be NO reading on the WATER pressure gage period!

If there is you have a bad meter and should replace it.

While the tank is empty you can check and set the air pressure using the tire valve at the top of the tank. The pressure here should be close to the cut in pressure. This would be either 30 or 40 PSI. BUT consult your tank literature on how to set this.
 
  #29  
Old 08-28-08, 11:41 AM
desertjim's Avatar
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Oct 2005
Location: USA
Posts: 53
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Originally Posted by dsc3507 View Post
Ok one more time....

The air gage (tire gage pushed on valve at top of tank) and the water pressure gage are two different things!

If you turn off the pump and totally empty the tank of water there should be NO reading on the WATER pressure gage period!

If there is you have a bad meter and should replace it.

While the tank is empty you can check and set the air pressure using the tire valve at the top of the tank. The pressure here should be close to the cut in pressure. This would be either 30 or 40 PSI. BUT consult your tank literature on how to set this.
Methinks megots it now! Thanks.

Someone had mentioned that the pressure wasn't from the water but the air in the tank. That threw me off course.

So, the "wrong gauge" they sold my wife turns out to be the "right gauge" now, eh

I'll let everyone know what happens.....if I'm not blown away .
 
Reply

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

BB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Trackbacks are Off
Pingbacks are Off
Refbacks are Off


Thread Tools
Search this Thread
Display Modes
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: