Replacing electric cooktop with gas


  #1  
Old 08-26-08, 06:29 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Question Replacing electric cooktop with gas

We are trying to replace our glass electric cooktop (hate cleaning the thing) with a gas cooktop.

The current cooktop is 240V and on a 50A dual pole breaker. From what I have been reading, it seems that I can't just convert that to 110V. So, if I have to install a new 110V outlet, what can I tap off of? In that area are the small appliance outlets, the microwave outlet, and on the other side of the wall is an outlet to our dining room. This thing can't draw a lot of power, since it only is needed for the igniters.
 
  #2  
Old 08-26-08, 06:38 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,389
Received 148 Votes on 131 Posts
Gas stoves are allowed to be on the small appliance branch circuit serving the kitchen and dining room.

I would pick whichever ktichen or dining receptacle resulted in the least amount of work. Leave the microwave circuit as is.

Be sure not to go over the number of allowable conductors in the device box where you get your feed from. This may mean installing a larger box.
 
  #3  
Old 08-26-08, 06:58 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Thanks for the rapid reply.

It seems that the dining room receptacle would be the least amount of work. It is directly opposite to the cabinet that the cooktop sits on. It has two cables going into that box. Though, I'm not sure yet where the plumber will be routing the gas line into that cabinet.

Also, I will be tiling the backsplash, so tearing into the drywall to tap into the small appliance circuit would not be a big deal. I already have some drywall (green board) left over from having to do some patching near the sink. Either of the small appliance outlets on that wall have two cables going into those boxes.
 
  #4  
Old 08-26-08, 07:04 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Also, the dining room outlet is on a different circuit than the kitchen outlets, if that makes any difference.
 
  #5  
Old 08-26-08, 07:05 AM
pcboss's Avatar
Forum Topic Moderator
Join Date: Jul 2002
Location: Maryland
Posts: 15,389
Received 148 Votes on 131 Posts
The minimum size box that you will need is 20.25 cubic inches without any deductions for internal clamps.

This is figured at 2.25 cu. in per #12 conductor. You have 3 cables of 2 conductor = 6x2.25 + 2 for the device +1 for all the grounds.
 
  #6  
Old 08-26-08, 07:15 AM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
That looks to be what the builder installed, so as far as box size goes, I can go to either the small appliance circuit or the dining room circuit.
 
  #7  
Old 08-26-08, 09:38 PM
G
Member
Thread Starter
Join Date: Aug 2008
Location: United States
Posts: 13
Received 0 Votes on 0 Posts
Well, I did manage to install a new 110V outlet off of the small appliance circuit. Though, I tore into the wall, only to find a heating and A/C duct in the way, so I had to route it to the outlet in the opposite direction.

The plumber came today and ran the gas line, so we are up and running.

Thanks for the help!

Now, I'm on to the next project...
 
 

Thread Tools
Search this Thread
 
Ask a Question
Question Title:
Description:
Your question will be posted in: