rewiring my basement.

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Old 08-28-08, 09:05 AM
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rewiring my basement.

Hi, i'm finishing my basement, and need to rerun the electricity down there to accomadate the greater load it'll be under.

The washer/drier are down there, and are currently on a 120v circuit breaker, which i don't think is enough seeing as how i can't run the dryer and a dehumidifier at the same time without blowing the fuse.

I'm going to need enough power to run 3 computers (two with 850watt PSUs, one with a 400wat PSU) constantly. plus monitors and perphials. I'll have 4 sets of track lighting 4 lights each. A television and also need an outlet that will run power tools including a shop vac sometimes.

I was wondering how to wire that ensuring i get good clean uninterrupted power (i need to make sure the 850w is available to those computers at all times)
 
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Old 08-28-08, 10:09 AM
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Smile

Adding up the wattages , one 20 amp circuit (120x20=2400w) would bring you close to the brink. I would run two 20 amp circuits or one multi-wire circuit. Either of those two will give you 4800 watts. I take it there is no need for 240v? Please wait for the Pro's to verify
 
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Old 08-28-08, 10:41 AM
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I believe the washer and drier are supposed to be run on a 240. They are not currently, but as i said, that fuse blows the moment i turn on anything else down there.
 
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Old 08-28-08, 12:07 PM
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The laundry area requires a dedicated 20A circuit. Both the washing machine and the gas dryer may be powered by this circuit. The laundry receptacles need to be GFCI protected. An electrical dryer requires a 30A 120/240V four-wire circuit.

For continuous loads (those which you intend to keep on more than 3 hours at a time) wattage should be limited to 80% of a circuit capacity. For example a 20A circuit can supply 2400W (20A * 120V = 2400W), however you should limit it to 1920W per circuit for continuous loads.

Is this basement area finished? If so, the circuits need to be supplied by AFCI breakers. If it is unfinished, the receptacles need to have GFCI protection.
 
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Old 08-28-08, 12:32 PM
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I ran seven new circuits to my basement when I finished it, and there isn't even a washer and dryer down there. More is always better.

How many square feet is your basement?
 
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Old 08-28-08, 01:45 PM
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The basement is "semi-finished" i'm putting my office down there, the floor is still cement, i erected some walls and covered them with paneling, but it wouldn't pass inspection as living space due to lack of insulation and no window exit.

The drier is gas powered, the washer is electric. I only figured they might require a 240 because of the fact that fuse flips so easily right now. I think what i'll probley do is leave the existing circuit for the laundry room since it works fine so long as i don't add anything else to it, and run two new ones, one for the office computers, and another for everything else.
 
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Old 08-28-08, 02:45 PM
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With cement floors, all of your receptacles do need to be GFCI protected.
 
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