Mounting sub panel to wall in attached garage

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Old 09-05-08, 03:21 PM
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Mounting sub panel to wall in attached garage

I have an attached garage, and would like to add a sub panel to provide 220V service. I am running romex from my main service panel under my crawl space to my garage. All four walls in my garage have drywall. These questions:

Is it ok to run the romex inside of the wall that separates my garage from my house?

Is it ok to mount my subpanel to the wall that separates my garage from my house? I heard that if I do that, I canít cut a hole in the dry wall to flush mount it. If thatísí true, would the same restriction apply to the other walls in the garage.

If I donít mount the subpanel to the wall separating my house, Iím going to have to route it up to the attic or run conduit. Is it ok to secure romex to the joists that run parallel to the floor?
 
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Old 09-05-08, 07:50 PM
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The wall separating the house and garage is required to be fire rated, I think a one hour rating although your local code may demand a longer rating. This requires no less than 1/2 inch gypsum drywall on both sides of the wall. Often 5/8 inch fire rated is installed on the garage side and that may be in your local code. Any penetrations in the wall must also meet this fire rating so in essence you cannot install the new panel in the wall although you MAY (local code allowing) be allowed to install a suitable backing (fire resistant plywood no less than 3/4 inch) spanning two studs and then surface mount the new panel.

Conduit penetrations of the fire rated wall are allowable as long as the hole the conduit goes through is suitably fire-stopped by fire-rated caulk. The surface mounted panel would require conduit for protection of the wiring (assuming you are using type NM-B cable) for any place where the cable is susceptible to physical damage.

Walls that are not in common to a living space do not need to meet fire ratings and so flush mount in these walls is acceptable.
 
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Old 09-06-08, 02:30 PM
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Thanks for the info. If I decide to run the wire up the wall and into the attic, is the wire allowed to be unsecured inside of the wall?
 
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Old 09-06-08, 08:05 PM
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Cables "fished" inside of finished walls do not need to be secured in the wall cavity. You do need to secure the cable to the originating box and the receiving box with the proper clamps.
 
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Old 09-08-08, 08:29 PM
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Furd, since the origin is going to be a hole I drill in my crawl space (vertically) would it be sufficient to just staple the wire to the joist I drill the hole in?
 
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Old 09-09-08, 12:13 AM
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Fasten the cable where it is accessible. Use the plastic straps with little nails on each end rather than staples. Staples are too easily driven to to the point of damaging the cable. Don't forget to seal the hole from the crawlspace to the wall cavity. You can use expanding foam, or better yet, firestop caulk.
 
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