GFCI on multi use circuit

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  #1  
Old 09-05-08, 06:08 PM
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GFCI on multi use circuit

Hi,
I am wiring my new pole barn and believe I can save some money on wire by using some 12-3 with ground to supply essentially two 20 amp circuits for outlets and wiring. My question is: will the possibly unbalanced return on the neutral due to having out of phase hot wires trip gfci units all the time?
Thanks for your help
J
 
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Old 09-05-08, 07:11 PM
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Not if you wire them correctly.

Run the red lead and and white lead of the 12/3 to the line side of one GFCI receptacle. Run the black lead and white lead of the 12/3 to the line side of a second GFCI receptacle. Run subsequent receptacles (no need for GFCI) from the load side of either GFCI receptacle but be sure to NOT connect any white wires of the additional receptacles to either the incoming white or the white on the GFCI NOT supplying the specific receptacle.
 
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Old 09-05-08, 09:36 PM
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Thank You Furd,
I'll give it a go, perhaps just using a couple of gfci breakers would simplify this, think so?
J
 
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Old 09-05-08, 09:47 PM
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Originally Posted by biggerjer View Post
Thank You Furd,
I'll give it a go, perhaps just using a couple of gfci breakers would simplify this, think so?
J
If would cost you considerably more money! just follow what furd said. Not complicated. Where the 12/3 enters split it two ways with 12/2 - one 12/2 - black to 12/3 black and the other 12/2 black to the 12/3 red. Connect all 3 whites together.

Now you have two 12/2 circuits. Just connect a GFCI on each like you would with any single circuit. you can feed additional outlets downstream from each one.

The neatest and actually code way to do this is to use PVC conduit and boxes. You could come in to a PVC box with three openings. Say one bottom and two top. The 12/3 would come in the bottom and the 12/2's would come out each opening on the top and run to the first (GFCI) outlet of each circuit.

This is the gray PVC stuff you can get at Home Depot or Lowes. 3/4" would be a good size to use although you could get away with 1/2" if you had to.
 
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Old 09-06-08, 12:27 PM
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My somewhat decent pic of the question.


 
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Old 09-07-08, 02:12 AM
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Quick note about using GFCI breakers:
I'm fond of using the breakers instead of outlet GFCIs because I've had too many of the cheap 15A outlet ones die within a couple years. However, in your case you would have to use a 2-pole GFCI breaker because your hots share a neutral, so they have to disconnect simultaneously. And the 2-poles are really painful if you can find 'em at all.
I do suggest using the 20A GFCI outlets even if you have no use for their 20A outlet. They will most likely outlast the cheapie 15A jobs.
 
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