Wiring a 220 outlet for a stove.

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Old 09-08-08, 10:29 AM
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Wiring a 220 outlet for a stove.

Our stove recently bit the dust. It had a good run. It came with the house and was probably about 20 years old. Anyway, I pulled it out to see what kind of plug we had behind it, and this is what I see:


How hard would it be to use this to make an outlet? Or should I consider wiring it direct to the oven like this one is? I rather like the idea of being able to unplug the stove if necessary.

What do you guys recommend?
 
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Old 09-08-08, 10:55 AM
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How hard would it be to use this to make an outlet? Or should I consider wiring it direct to the oven like this one is?
Are you really saying it is wired to a separate oven you are not replacing? I think you are actually misunderstanding what you are looking at. If the stove is wired to a line coming out of the wall and that wire simply enters the stove near the oven then maybe. 3 or 4 wires?
 
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Old 09-08-08, 10:58 AM
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Originally Posted by ray2047 View Post
Are you really saying it is wired to a separate oven you are not replacing? I think you are actually misunderstanding what you are looking at. If the stove is wired to a line coming out of the wall and that wire simply enters the stove near the oven then maybe. 3 or 4 wires?
What I am asking is, can I just disconnect this wire from the OLD stove, and use it to hook up an outlet? Or should I just wire up the NEW stove directly to the cable, and not bother installing an outlet?
 
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Old 09-08-08, 11:12 AM
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The outlet is your choice. It is a convenience to remove the stove. But then how often do you do that. The problem may be how it is currently wired. Old stove connections often used three wires with no ground. The neutral or white wire of the three was used a the ground and bonded to the stove. Modern code and stoves use 4 wires which includes a separate ground. This has to go back to the panel that serves the circuit. So to do it right, if it is 3 wires now you would have to rewire back to the main panel with 3 wire with ground cable (4 conductors) This is typically 6/3 with ground protected at 50A, but depends on the actually load rating of the stove you are installing. the outlet would be a 4 prong outlet and plug. All of the stuff you need is available at Home Depot or Lowes. Your new stove manual should detail the electrical installation instructions.
 
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Old 09-08-08, 11:32 AM
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Ok, the stove won't be here until Wed. So basically what you are saying is, if it is just 3 wires, hook up the outlet. If it 4, feel free to wire it to the stove or, run a new line to the main with the 4 wire configuration?

Here are the specs for the new stove:

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1...&cName=&sName=

Notably:

Power Source:
Electric Supply: 240V
Max. Amp Load: 40
 
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Old 09-08-08, 11:46 AM
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Although a new four-wire installation is a somewhat safer option, you are legally allowed to re-use the old three-wire connection provided that the wire gauge is large enough to handle the demands of the new unit. If you were to install a new circuit, it would have to be four-wire.

The installation instructions should have connection procedure for both three-wire and four-wire hook-ups; follow the one that meets your situation.

To meet the 40A load, your existing wire should be #8 copper (or larger).

If the existing wire is aluminum, please post back for more information as there are safety issues pertaining to proper connection of aluminum wire.
 
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Old 09-08-08, 11:52 AM
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Ok, thanks you guys, great info!

One more question. Before I pulled the old oven out, I turned on the oven light, then turned off the breaker (light went out).. The breaker indicates it is 50 amps. Is this OK with the new oven that states:

Max. Amp Load: 40

?
 
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Old 09-08-08, 12:22 PM
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Yes, it should be okay to use the existing 50A circuit for your new range.
 
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Old 09-08-08, 12:25 PM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Although a new four-wire installation is a somewhat safer option, you are legally allowed to re-use the old three-wire connection provided that the wire gauge is large enough to handle the demands of the new unit. If you were to install a new circuit, it would have to be four-wire.
Not to confuse the issue but since you all are 100% locked to the code and we have no idea who installed the original wiring and if it was code, your statement is true only if the wiring goes directly to the main service panel and not to a sub panel. While it is unlikely it does, there is always the possibility.

Again knowing what I do about electricity and potential faults if it were my installation it would be 4 wires back to the source period but people come here for the most part to know what they can get away with, not what would be in their best interest! Using the neutral as a ground is an accident waiting to happen in my book.
 
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Old 09-08-08, 12:30 PM
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It goes back to the main panel, not a sub panel.

Thanks everyone!
 
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Old 09-09-08, 08:34 AM
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Ok, removed the back panel of the stove, and this is what I had:

http://www.savedpage.com/download.php?id=350

Wire nuts were those older permanent kind so had to cut them off at the nut. Here is what I have now:

http://www.savedpage.com/download.php?id=351

So, I am assuming I have the four wire setup.. How can I tell about gauge? I am not one of those who can just look at a wire and tell you what gauge it is.
 
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Old 09-09-08, 09:01 AM
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Yes you do have a four-wire circuit. It does not look like #6 wire; perhaps #8 -- usually it's printed on the wires somewhere. Can you tell if the width of the metal ground wire is the same width as the metal of the hot wires?

If this wire is actually #8, the breaker should not exceed 40A so that will need to be changed.
 
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Old 09-09-08, 10:25 AM
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Originally Posted by ibpooks View Post
Yes you do have a four-wire circuit. It does not look like #6 wire; perhaps #8 -- usually it's printed on the wires somewhere. Can you tell if the width of the metal ground wire is the same width as the metal of the hot wires?

If this wire is actually #8, the breaker should not exceed 40A so that will need to be changed.
Ok, the white wire has some writing on it, it is a bit hard to read, but one part clearly says 12 AWG. I am assuming that means 12 gauge.

When you say the hot wires, which colors are you referring to? (Note, I am rather colorblind will need to explain this to the wife)
 
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Old 09-09-08, 10:41 AM
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The hot wires would be the Red and Black.

If the wiring is truly 12 gauge wire this will change your ability to continue to use this wiring.
 
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Old 09-09-08, 10:45 AM
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Originally Posted by Jafo232 View Post
Ok, the white wire has some writing on it, it is a bit hard to read, but one part clearly says 12 AWG. I am assuming that means 12 gauge.
If true then this wire is too small. Suggest you go to the hardware store and buy One foot of #12 THWN, one foot # 10, and one foot #8. Strip the insulation off for an inch or so on your samples and compare the copper wire itself the the wires in your cable. If the wire does indeed appear to be #12 you need to remove the breaker box cover and look at the wires from the breaker. Danger! Be very careful. Throw the main breaker before removing cover. Even with main breaker off there is danger of electrocution.
When you say the hot wires, which colors are you referring to? (Note, I am rather colorblind will need to explain this to the wife)
Any color except white, bare, or green. Usually hots are black and red.

Edit: My reason for asking size of wire at breaker panel is that I'm thinking the armored cable is actually a "whip" that came with the stove" which would explain the #12. The actual house wire would be at the other end of the whip. Maybe buried in the wall. Hard to tell but the wires in the photo looked "cloth" covered such as I associate with appliance high temp wire not smooth plastic of house wiring.
 

Last edited by ray2047; 09-09-08 at 11:21 AM. Reason: Clarify my original post.
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Old 09-09-08, 01:19 PM
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Don't assume you have four wire at the other end of that cable, which is part of the old stove, not the premises wiring (meaning you cannot connect that to your new stove.).

Before 1996, it was common practice to wires stoves and dryers up to a 3 wire circuit.
 
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Old 09-09-08, 01:50 PM
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Well, since I have seen nothing cut and dry with this setup, I have just decided to hire an electrician. I am quite comfortable doing light wiring and changing outlets etc., but I have a feeling this one is a little beyond my comfort level.

I traced the "whip" cable under the floor (through a drop ceiling) and found where it met up with a junction box. From there the wiring is completely foreign to me. I have a call out to an electrician that comes recommended by family. Will see what he has to say about it.

I really want to go with the plug outlet instead of wiring it direct. I just don't like the idea that whenever I want to move the stove out, I would have to call an electrician.
 
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Old 12-14-10, 03:48 PM
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ok. the{ red.black..white} and of course the ground wire {220 volt}is hanging from the wall box..the white receptical for those wires to hook unto is not marked in any way {to know which wire goes where?} or does it matter when it is not marked>whit>.red>.black>.any ideas<<lol
 
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Old 12-14-10, 03:57 PM
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X & Y Red and Black Order doesn't matter.( Usually brass colored lug)

W=White (usually Silver lug)

G=ground (usually green lug)
 
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Old 12-14-10, 04:02 PM
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220 hook-up for kitchen stove

ok the 220 volt wire is hanging from the wall outlet {kitchen stove}..these are {bl.red.white.} the stove [white receptical has 4 screws.only the ground wire is marked} no other markings or colour code what so ever..nobody wants the answer of gauge of wire..what wire from wall goes on what screw on receptical...???thats a pretty straight question isn't it>>so come on with the right answers please..
 
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Old 12-14-10, 04:08 PM
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that was a pretty fast answer mr. moderator>>lol
 
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